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Armonk NY Homes for Sale

Home Builders Warn of Significant Affordability Declines | Armonk Real Estate

Housing affordability posted a modest gain for average conditions in the first quarter of 2022 as a strong jump in national median income helped to offset a gradual rise in interest rates. However, home builders warn of current deteriorating conditions as a sharp jump in mortgage rates in March and April coupled with ongoing building material supply chain disruptions, labor shortages and high inflation drive up housing costs.

According to the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB)/Wells Fargo Housing Opportunity Index (HOI), 56.9% of new and existing homes sold between the beginning of January and end of March were affordable to families earning the U.S. median income of $90,000. While this is up from the 54.2% of homes sold in the fourth quarter of 2021, current market indicators point to worsening affordability conditions.

The first quarter HOI was calculated based on the following key factors:

  • An average quarterly interest rate of 3.86%, up 70 basis points from the previous quarter
  • A 2022 median income of $90,000, up from last year’s $79,900.
  • A national median home price of $365,000, up $5,000 from the fourth quarter of 2021 and a whopping $45,000 from the first quarter of 2021.

Affordability Dips Below 50% Based on Recent Mortgage Rates

Keeping all other factors the same and calculating nationwide affordability conditions based on end of April mortgage rates of 5.11% instead of the first quarter average of 3.86%, the HOI would have fallen from 54.2 in the fourth quarter of 2021 to 48.7 today.

This means that based on where the housing market stands today, just 48.7% of homes sold in the first quarter were affordable to median-income families, the lowest affordability level recorded on the HOI since the beginning of the revised series in the first quarter of 2012.

“The first quarter reading is a backward gauge, as surging interest rates, ongoing building material supply chain constraints and labor shortages continue to raise construction costs and put upward pressure on home prices,” said NAHB Chairman Jerry Konter, a home builder and developer from Savannah, Ga.

Every quarter-point hike in mortgage rates means that 1.3 million households are priced out of the market for a nationwide median priced home. And with the Federal Reserve moving aggressively to raise short-term interest rates and reduce its holding of mortgage-backed securities to combat inflation that is running at a 40-year high, mortgage rates are expected to rise even further.

“Looking at current market conditions, affordability woes continue to mount as rising interest rates and home building material costs that are up 20% year-over-year are causing housing costs to rise much faster than wages,” said NAHB Chief Economist Robert Dietz. “The HOI falling below 50 using these real-time estimates is an indication of significant housing affordability burdens, particularly for frustrated, prospective first-time buyers. The best way to ease growing affordability challenges is for policymakers to address ongoing supply chain disruptions that will allow builders to construct more affordable homes.”

The Most and Least Affordable Markets in the First Quarter

Lansing-East Lansing, Mich., was the nation’s most affordable major housing market, defined as a metro with a population of at least 500,000. There, 92.3% of all new and existing homes sold in the first quarter were affordable to families earning the area’s median income of $89,500.

Top five affordable major housing markets:

  1. Lansing-East Lansing, Mich.
  2. Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Ind.
  3. ScrantonWilkes-Barre, Pa.
  4. Rochester, N.Y.
  5. Dayton-Kettering, Ohio

Meanwhile, Wheeling, W.Va.-Ohio., was rated the nation’s most affordable small market, with 97.3% of homes sold in the first quarter being affordable to families earning the median income of $75,400.

Top five affordable small housing markets:

  1. Wheeling, W.Va.-Ohio
  2. Cumberland, Md.-W.Va.
  3. Elmira, N.Y.
  4. Utica-Rome, N.Y.
  5. Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, Iowa-Ill.

For the sixth straight quarter, Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, Calif., remained the nation’s least affordable major housing market. There, just 8.3% of the homes sold during the first quarter were affordable to families earning the area’s median income of $90,100.

Top five least affordable major housing markets—all located in California:

  1. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale
  2. Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine
  3. San Francisco-San Mateo-Redwood City
  4. San Diego-Chula Vista-Carlsbad
  5. Stockton

The top five least affordable small housing markets were also in the Golden State. At the very bottom of the affordability chart was Salinas, Calif., where 9.2% of all new and existing homes sold in the first quarter were affordable to families earning the area’s median income of $90,100.

Top five least affordable small housing markets—all located in California:

  1. Salinas
  2. Santa Maria-Santa Barbara
  3. San Luis Obispo-Paso Robles
  4. Napa
  5. Santa Cruz-Watsonville

Please visit nahb.org/hoi for tables, historic data and details.

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Mortgage applications are down 56% | Armonk Real Estate

Mortgage applications decreased 13.1 percent from one week earlier, according to data from the Mortgage Bankers Association’s (MBA) Weekly Mortgage Applications Survey for the week ending February 18, 2022. 

The Market Composite Index, a measure of mortgage loan application volume, decreased 13.1 percent on a seasonally adjusted basis from one week earlier. On an unadjusted basis, the Index decreased 11 percent compared with the previous week. The Refinance Index decreased 16 percent from the previous week and was 56 percent lower than the same week one year ago. The seasonally adjusted Purchase Index decreased 10 percent from one week earlier. The unadjusted Purchase Index decreased 6 percent compared with the previous week and was 6 percent lower than the same week one year ago.  

“Mortgage applications dropped to their lowest level since December 2019 last week, as mortgage rates continued to inch higher. The 30-year fixed rate was 4.06 percent, almost a full percentage point higher than a year ago. Higher mortgage rates have quickly shut off refinances, with activity down in six of the first seven weeks of 2022. Conventional refinances in particular saw a 17 percent decrease last week,” said Joel Kan, MBA’s Associate Vice President of Economic and Industry Forecasting. “Purchase applications, already constrained by elevated sales prices and tight inventory, have also been impacted by these higher rates and declined for the third straight week. While the average loan size did not increase this week, it remained close to the survey’s record high.”  

The refinance share of mortgage activity decreased to 50.1 percent of total applications from 52.8 percent the previous week. The adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) share of activity increased to 5.1 percent of total applications.  

The FHA share of total applications increased to 8.7 percent from 8.3 percent the week prior. The VA share of total applications increased to 9.9 percent from 9.3 percent the week prior. The USDA share of total applications remained unchanged at 0.4 percent from the week prior.

The average contract interest rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages with conforming loan balances ($647,200 or less) increased to 4.06 percent from 4.05 percent, with points increasing to 0.48 from 0.45 (including the origination fee) for 80 percent loan-to-value ratio (LTV) loans. The effective rate increased from last week.

The average contract interest rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages with jumbo loan balances (greater than $647,200) increased to 3.84 percent from 3.81 percent, with points increasing to 0.45 from 0.39 (including the origination fee) for 80 percent LTV loans. The effective rate increased from last week.  

The average contract interest rate for 30-year fixed-rate mortgages backed by the FHA increased to 4.09 percent from 4.01 percent, with points decreasing to 0.56 from 0.59 (including the origination fee) for 80 percent LTV loans. The effective rate increased from last week.  

The average contract interest rate for 15-year fixed-rate mortgages increased to 3.42 percent from 3.37 percent, with points decreasing to 0.45 from 0.50 (including the origination fee) for 80 percent LTV loans. The effective rate increased from last week.

The average contract interest rate for 5/1 ARMs decreased to 3.26 percent from 3.36 percent, with points decreasing to 0.34 from 0.48 (including the origination fee) for 80 percent LTV loans. The effective rate decreased from last week. 

Westchester 2021 sales up 10.4% | Armonk Real Estate

“2021 continued to be a record-breaking year in real estate, not just in the markets we serve but also nationally,” Liz Nunan, president and CEO of Houlihan Lawrence, said in the brokerage’s newly released fourth-quarter report on lower Hudson Valley real estate.

Liz Nunan

Home sales in Westchester were up 10.4% for 2021, while Putnam and Dutchess counties reported gains of 8% and 2.7%, respectively. Nearly every submarket in Westchester posted double-digit sales gains, according to the report.

“While the first half of 2021 varied in specific metrics to the second half, two factors remained constant. The inventory was at an all-time low, and buyer demand was exceptionally strong,” Nunan said. “As the year progressed, the sales outpaced inventory replacement, and this further restriction led to a decline in pending sales and, eventually, closed sales.”

In the fourth quarter, the number of listings declined 42% in Westchester County year over year. In Putnam County, that number was down 34%, and in Dutchess County listings were down 44%.

“2022 will likely not see the record-breaking number of sales seen in 2021. But until the supply and demand fall into balance, the market will still be charged with buyers, and sellers will continue to prosper,” Nunan said.

In the fourth quarter, 1,669 single-family homes sold in Westchester, compared with 2,228 in the first quarter of 2020, a drop of 25.1%. The median sale price was $725,000, a 1% drop from $732,000 in the fourth quarter of 2020.

For all of 2021, 7,541 single-family homes changed hands in Westchester, compared with 6,649 in 2020, a 10.4% gain. The median sale price for the year went up to $780,000 from $735,000 in 2020, a 6.1% gain.

The number of condominiums sold in Westchester went up by 31.8% from 1,242 in 2020 to 1,637 in 2021. The median sale price also was up at $425, 000 in 2021 compared with $403,000 in 2020, a 5.5% increase.

In the fourth quarter, condo sales dropped 4.3% from 470 in the fourth quarter of 2020 to 450 in 2021’s fourth quarter. The median sale price increased 4.9% from $410,000 in Q4 of 2020 to $430,000 in Q4 of 2021.

Co-op sales in Westchester were up by 35.3% from 1,562 units sold in 2020 to 2,114 in 2021. The median sale price was $194,100, up 6.1% from 2020’s $183,000.

For the fourth quarter of 2021, co-op sales stood at 547 units, a 10.3% increase from the 496 units that changed hands in the fourth quarter of 2020. The median sale price inched up 2.9% from $185,000 in Q4 of 2020 to $190,400 in Q4 of 2021.

In Putnam, there were 1,342 single-family homes sold in 2021 compared with 1,241 in 2020. The median sale price for the year was $440,000, up 16% from 2020’s $379,999. It also was up 16% for the fourth quarter of 2021 compared with the fourth quarter of 2020, reaching $455,750 from $394,250.

There were 199 condos sold in Putnam during the year, compared with 175 sold in 2020, a 15% increase. The median sale price was up 12.7% at $290,000 compared with 2020’s $257,250. For the fourth quarter of 2021, 43 units were sold, a drop of 28.3% from the 60 units sold in the fourth quarter of 2020. However, the median sale price went up 12.1% from $280,950 in Q4 of 2020 to $315,000 in Q4 of 2021.

In Dutchess County, 2,759 single-family homes were sold in 2021 compared with 2,686 in 2020. In the fourth quarter of 2021, 665 single-family homes sold compared with 997 in 2020’s fourth quarter, a drop of 33.3%. The median sale price rose 14.7% from $339,900 in 2020 to $390,000 in 2021. For the fourth quarter of 2021, the median sale price was up 7.3% to $396,000 from $369,000 in the same period in 2020.

There were 628 condominiums sold in 2021 in Dutchess, up 38% from the 455 that sold in 2020. There were 152 sold in Q4 of 2021 compared with 159 in Q4 of 2020, a 4.4% drop. The median condo sale price was $231,056 for Q4 of 2021, down 7.6% from $250,000 in the fourth quarter of 2020. For the year,the median sale price was $235,000, a 5.4% increase from 2020’s $225,000.

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Inventory down, sales slow | Armonk Real Estate

New listings of homes for sale fell 9% from a year earlier and closed home sales were down 5%.

The median price of homes sold in September was $376,800, up 14% from a year earlier, the lowest growth rate since December 2020. September marked the 14th consecutive month of double-digit price gains. Closed home sales and new listings of homes for sale both fell from a year earlier, by 5% and 9% respectively.

“The severe lack of inventory is restricting home sales, said Redfin Chief Economist Daryl Fairweather. “Even though plenty of people bought homes last year, many homebuyers waited while the pandemic went from bad to worse and remote-work policies were finalized. The homebuyers who are just beginning their search are finding that the well has run dry. But I am hopeful that as it becomes easier to get building materials, we will finally have a strong year for new construction in 2022. That’s what the market needs more than anything.”

Market SummarySeptember 2021Month-Over-MonthYear-Over-Year
Median sale price$376,800-0.8%13.9%
Homes sold, seasonally-adjusted613,2001.6%-5.4%
Pending sales, seasonally-adjusted604,9002.9%2.8%
New listings, seasonally-adjusted631,800-2.3%-9.0%
All Homes for sale, seasonally-adjusted1,384,200-2.0%-19.0%
Median days on market182-11
Months of supply1.40-0.3
Sold above list47.8%-4.1 pts13.8 pts
Median Off-Market Redfin Estimate$381,9007.3%19.9%
Average Sale-to-list101.0%-0.6 pts1.6 pts
Average 30-year fixed mortgage rate2.90%+0.06 pts+0.01 pts

† – ‘pts’ = percentage point change

Median sale prices increased from a year earlier in all but one of the 85 largest metro areas Redfin tracks: Bridgeport, CT, where prices were down 2.2%. A year ago prices were up 32% in Bridgeport as the area experienced a sudden flood of interest from homebuyers looking to leave New York. The current price decline is likely a cooling from an extremely overheated state.

The largest price increases in September 2021 were in North Port, FL (+30%), Salt Lake City (+28%) and Austin, TX (+27%).

Home Prices Up 14% in September

Seasonally-adjusted home sales in September were down 5% from a year earlier, the second annual decline in 16 months. Home sales fell in 66 of the 85 largest metro areas Redfin tracks. The biggest sales declines were seen in New Orleans (-42%), Bridgeport, CT (-24%) and Salt Lake City (-23%). The largest gains were in places where sales were still somewhat depressed in September 2020, including New York (+26%), Honolulu (+24%), and San Jose, CA (+15%).

Seasonally Adjusted Home Sales Down 5% Year Over Year

Seasonally adjusted active listings—the count of all homes that were for sale at any time during the month—fell 19% year over year in September, on par with the previous month.

Only three of the 85 largest metros tracked by Redfin posted a year-over-year increase in the number of seasonally adjusted active listings of homes for sale: Austin, TX (+3%), Tacoma, WA (+3%) and Columbus, OH (+0.3%). The biggest year-over-year declines in active housing supply in September were in Baton Rouge, LA (-53%), Salt Lake City (-50%) and Rochester, NY (-47%).

Seasonally Adjusted Homes for Sale Fell 19%

Seasonally adjusted new listings of homes for sale were down 9% in September from a year earlier, only the second decline since February. New listings fell from a year ago in 75 of the 85 largest metro areas. The biggest declines were in Baton Rouge (-59%), Allentown, PA (-57%) and Salt Lake City, UT (-51%). New listings rose the most from a year ago in Austin, TX (+18%), Tacoma, WA (+9%) and Portland, OR (+8%).

Seasonally Adjusted New Listings Down 9% Year Over Year

Measures of housing market competition based on completed home sales eased further in September.

The typical home that sold in September went under contract in 18 days—more than a week faster than a year earlier, when homes sold in a median 29 days, but up three days from the record low in June.

Time on Market Inched Up to 18 Days in September

In September, 48% of homes sold above list price, down 8 percentage points from the record high in June, but up 14 percentage points from a year earlier.

48% of Homes Sold Over List Price in September

The average sale-to-list price ratio also dipped slightly in September to 101%, down from a record high of 102.5% in June but up from 99.4% a year earlier.

Average Sale to List Price Ratio Fell to 101% in September

Other September Highlights

Competition

Prices

Sales

Inventory

Redfin Estimate

Below are market-by-market breakdowns for prices, inventory, new listings and sales for markets with populations of 750,000 or more. For downloadable data on all of the markets Redfin tracks, visit the Redfin Data Center.

Median Sale Price

Redfin MetroMedian Sale PriceMonth-Over-MonthYear-Over-Year
Albany, NY$270,0000.0%9.1%
Allentown, PA$270,5000.2%13.9%
Anaheim, CA$900,000-0.6%15.1%
Atlanta, GA$330,0000.0%16.6%
Austin, TX$452,000-4.8%27.3%
Bakersfield, CA$328,5004.3%20.6%
Baltimore, MD$342,000-2.3%5.2%
Baton Rouge, LA$242,400-3.8%7.7%
Birmingham, AL$257,9003.2%5.3%
Boston, MA$605,000-4.0%8.0%
Bridgeport, CT$484,000-8.7%-2.2%
Buffalo, NY$217,800-3.0%15.4%
Camden, NJ$275,0000.0%17.0%
Charleston, SC$355,000-1.4%13.6%
Charlotte, NC$343,0000.0%16.3%
Chicago, IL$294,500-3.4%6.7%
Cincinnati, OH$240,000-2.4%10.6%
Cleveland, OH$185,900-7.1%6.2%
Columbus, OH$279,900-1.8%13.4%
Dallas, TX$375,000-1.1%17.2%
Dayton, OH$180,0000.6%6.5%
Denver, CO$530,0000.0%16.5%
Detroit, MI$186,0003.3%12.7%
El Paso, TX$200,000-4.3%9.3%
Elgin, IL$270,000-1.8%8.0%
Fort Lauderdale, FL$350,000-1.4%14.8%
Fort Worth, TX$315,0000.0%18.9%
Frederick, MD$480,000-4.0%8.3%
Fresno, CA$370,000-0.3%15.6%
Grand Rapids, MI$269,7001.2%10.1%
Greensboro, NC$230,0002.5%16.2%
Greenville, SC$269,500-2.2%14.2%
Hartford, CT$275,000-3.5%9.1%
Houston, TX$300,000-2.3%14.8%
Indianapolis, IN$250,0000.0%11.1%
Jacksonville, FL$310,5000.5%19.4%
Kansas City, MO$270,000-1.8%3.9%
Knoxville, TN$289,0000.2%18.0%
Lake County, IL$292,0000.7%6.2%
Las Vegas, NV$378,0000.8%19.3%
Los Angeles, CA$815,000-0.6%12.1%
Louisville, KY$240,0001.5%8.1%
McAllen, TX$203,5008.8%25.1%
Memphis, TN$245,000-1.2%1.2%
Miami, FL$406,800-0.8%14.6%
Milwaukee, WI$270,0000.0%10.2%
Minneapolis, MN$345,000-1.4%10.8%
Montgomery County, PA$390,000-3.7%8.2%
Nashville, TN$390,000-0.8%19.1%
Nassau County, NY$590,000-1.7%12.4%
New Brunswick, NJ$429,000-0.2%11.1%
New Haven, CT$275,000-2.5%5.8%
New Orleans, LA$289,4007.6%17.2%
New York, NY$650,000-3.7%13.0%
Newark, NJ$465,000-4.1%6.7%
North Port, FL$389,0003.5%29.7%
Oakland, CA$940,0000.0%13.3%
Oklahoma City, OK$226,3002.9%9.9%
Omaha, NE$250,000-2.0%8.2%
Orlando, FL$335,0000.3%18.8%
Oxnard, CA$765,500-1.2%9.4%
Philadelphia, PA$260,000-4.1%6.1%
Phoenix, AZ$417,0001.2%25.6%
Pittsburgh, PA$210,800-4.2%4.9%
Portland, OR$500,000-3.3%11.2%
Providence, RI$385,000-0.9%14.9%
Raleigh, NC$380,5001.5%20.8%
Richmond, VA$317,500-2.3%7.8%
Riverside, CA$505,0000.0%16.1%
Rochester, NY$195,000-2.5%11.4%
Sacramento, CA$550,0000.0%16.7%
Salt Lake City, UT$489,0003.6%27.8%
San Antonio, TX$297,0000.7%14.2%
San Diego, CA$760,0002.0%14.8%
San Francisco, CA$1,530,0001.3%5.5%
San Jose, CA$1,340,000-1.1%11.8%
Seattle, WA$710,900-2.6%11.8%
St. Louis, MO$230,0000.0%7.5%
Tacoma, WA$501,000-0.8%16.5%
Tampa, FL$320,0001.6%20.1%
Tucson, AZ$321,4002.1%23.1%
Tulsa, OK$225,000-2.2%5.6%
Honolulu, HI$683,500-2.4%6.5%
Virginia Beach, VA$283,000-2.4%4.8%
Warren, MI$270,000-1.7%8.9%
Washington, D.C.$480,000-2.0%5.0%
West Palm Beach, FL$365,0000.0%14.1%
Worcester, MA$371,0000.3%11.9%
National$376,800-0.8%13.9%

Homes Sold

Redfin MetroHomes SoldMonth-Over-MonthYear-Over-Year
Albany, NY1,079-11.0%-5.6%
Allentown, PA1,002-8.9%-12.6%
Anaheim, CA3,027-5.1%-9.5%
Atlanta, GA9,936-10.4%-7.7%
Austin, TX3,372-7.0%-10.3%
Bakersfield, CA826-9.1%-10.8%
Baltimore, MD4,323-8.4%-0.1%
Baton Rouge, LA1,011-1.9%-13.8%
Birmingham, AL1,643-10.9%-2.2%
Boston, MA4,975-11.4%-3.8%
Bridgeport, CT1,394-14.3%-23.5%
Buffalo, NY1,090-15.7%-9.8%
Camden, NJ1,947-8.1%-2.3%
Charleston, SC1,676-11.1%-11.6%
Charlotte, NC4,688-6.9%-2.8%
Chicago, IL9,704-14.3%-6.1%
Cincinnati, OH3,025-8.2%-7.6%
Cleveland, OH3,176-2.7%6.5%
Columbus, OH3,341-6.3%2.8%
Dallas, TX6,457-6.6%-8.1%
Dayton, OH1,2250.4%-3.2%
Denver, CO5,574-6.8%-9.2%
Detroit, MI2,097-4.9%-3.0%
El Paso, TX869-13.3%-9.1%
Elgin, IL1,247-12.9%-9.2%
Fort Lauderdale, FL3,035-14.5%-3.9%
Fort Worth, TX3,352-5.7%-5.7%
Frederick, MD1,838-11.9%-2.2%
Fresno, CA843-7.1%3.4%
Grand Rapids, MI1,408-8.3%-17.6%
Greensboro, NC1,122-2.0%9.1%
Greenville, SC1,3590.7%-2.2%
Hartford, CT1,726-10.5%-6.3%
Houston, TX9,447-8.3%0.6%
Indianapolis, IN3,711-4.2%-0.8%
Jacksonville, FL2,821-14.1%-11.5%
Kansas City, MO3,689-7.2%-4.8%
Knoxville, TN1,409-5.2%-4.7%
Lake County, IL1,455-12.2%-8.1%
Las Vegas, NV4,154-3.5%4.9%
Los Angeles, CA6,889-1.5%3.3%
Louisville, KY1,880-2.1%3.2%
McAllen, TX376-13.2%-18.4%
Memphis, TN1,256-15.8%3.7%
Miami, FL2,915-17.8%3.8%
Milwaukee, WI2,181-10.3%-7.3%
Minneapolis, MN6,391-9.8%-5.8%
Montgomery County, PA2,709-16.7%-7.3%
Nashville, TN3,692-9.1%-11.9%
Nassau County, NY2,934-12.5%-8.5%
New Brunswick, NJ3,483-12.5%-18.6%
New Haven, CT1,194-8.5%-7.5%
New Orleans, LA930-28.5%-41.7%
New York, NY7,033-21.0%25.9%
Newark, NJ2,278-20.3%-21.9%
North Port, FL2,091-3.8%-11.2%
Oakland, CA2,941-6.3%2.2%
Oklahoma City, OK2,250-11.6%-6.2%
Omaha, NE1,347-6.5%-6.5%
Orlando, FL4,613-4.6%7.8%
Oxnard, CA8760.1%-7.2%
Philadelphia, PA2,452-7.4%-6.2%
Phoenix, AZ8,8592.9%-1.8%
Pittsburgh, PA2,604-9.1%-9.4%
Portland, OR4,057-4.4%-5.7%
Providence, RI2,2121.4%-2.8%
Raleigh, NC2,401-13.2%-11.6%
Richmond, VA1,982-11.7%6.6%
Riverside, CA5,811-0.5%-4.6%
Rochester, NY1,195-13.8%-14.3%
Sacramento, CA2,954-6.6%-17.8%
Salt Lake City, UT1,515-9.9%-23.3%
San Antonio, TX3,257-8.2%-7.3%
San Diego, CA3,592-3.6%-6.7%
San Francisco, CA1,223-4.6%8.0%
San Jose, CA1,709-3.0%14.7%
Seattle, WA5,312-3.2%-1.1%
St. Louis, MO4,332-6.1%-1.3%
Tacoma, WA1,756-2.1%3.9%
Tampa, FL6,442-3.0%3.3%
Tucson, AZ1,483-3.7%-8.7%
Tulsa, OK1,610-2.6%4.1%
Honolulu, HI1,020-4.1%23.6%
Virginia Beach, VA3,051-7.7%7.7%
Warren, MI4,135-3.5%-12.5%
Washington, D.C.6,963-12.9%-9.1%
West Palm Beach, FL2,811-14.4%-13.2%
Worcester, MA1,231-5.0%3.0%
National613,2001.6%-5.4%

New Listings

Redfin MetroNew ListingsMonth-Over-MonthYear-Over-Year
Albany, NY1,118-16.6%-20.9%
Allentown, PA534-35.3%-57.3%
Anaheim, CA2,567-16.1%-27.4%
Atlanta, GA9,548-14.1%-10.4%
Austin, TX3,840-7.3%17.6%
Bakersfield, CA992-6.0%-5.7%
Baltimore, MD4,408-10.4%-8.5%
Baton Rouge, LA440-40.0%-59.0%
Birmingham, AL1,543-14.9%-13.0%
Boston, MA6,47832.2%-4.6%
Bridgeport, CT1,338-5.8%-30.7%
Buffalo, NY1,113-24.7%-22.8%
Camden, NJ1,845-14.7%-15.8%
Charleston, SC1,753-5.3%-2.2%
Charlotte, NC3,143-26.2%-36.0%
Chicago, IL10,927-7.4%-10.1%
Cincinnati, OH3,123-15.0%-7.1%
Cleveland, OH3,287-5.7%-4.2%
Columbus, OH3,305-9.7%1.3%
Dallas, TX6,655-10.0%-2.4%
Dayton, OH1,273-11.5%-7.0%
Denver, CO5,9180.3%0.4%
Detroit, MI2,561-11.5%2.2%
El Paso, TX956-5.7%-1.4%
Elgin, IL1,144-18.1%-7.7%
Fort Lauderdale, FL2,995-12.4%-25.2%
Fort Worth, TX3,415-6.8%1.9%
Frederick, MD1,9692.0%-1.3%
Fresno, CA883-9.2%-6.8%
Grand Rapids, MI1,536-5.9%-4.4%
Greensboro, NC780-24.3%-27.4%
Greenville, SC1,309-9.3%-2.7%
Hartford, CT1,788-6.4%-15.0%
Houston, TX10,080-13.5%3.0%
Indianapolis, IN3,727-7.4%-7.4%
Jacksonville, FL3,131-8.4%5.8%
Kansas City, MO3,464-12.8%-11.5%
Knoxville, TN1,203-17.2%-11.3%
Lake County, IL1,291-15.3%-12.9%
Las Vegas, NV4,416-11.4%-4.4%
Los Angeles, CA6,806-10.8%-18.9%
Louisville, KY1,997-6.6%-0.7%
McAllen, TX503-13.3%-10.5%
Memphis, TN1,260-15.7%-3.7%
Miami, FL3,908-5.9%-2.2%
Milwaukee, WI2,212-9.2%-8.0%
Minneapolis, MN6,586-8.0%-10.4%
Montgomery County, PA2,555-9.0%-13.3%
Nashville, TN3,801-0.7%-5.8%
Nassau County, NY2,986-9.8%-28.8%
New Brunswick, NJ3,491-14.7%-29.2%
New Haven, CT1,168-16.5%-23.1%
New Orleans, LA773-49.1%-49.4%
New York, NY8,7196.6%-22.6%
Newark, NJ2,464-8.4%-27.7%
North Port, FL2,169-8.2%-9.7%
Oakland, CA3,078-4.2%-3.9%
Oklahoma City, OK2,231-16.6%-2.1%
Omaha, NE1,353-0.3%-3.8%
Orlando, FL4,599-10.8%-3.6%
Oxnard, CA806-14.0%-32.4%
Philadelphia, PA2,988-2.2%-10.0%
Phoenix, AZ8,765-10.2%-12.0%
Pittsburgh, PA2,870-11.0%0.5%
Portland, OR4,150-4.0%8.3%
Providence, RI2,292-6.3%-14.3%
Raleigh, NC2,6581.3%-1.6%
Richmond, VA1,890-11.6%-10.7%
Riverside, CA6,307-5.9%-3.8%
Rochester, NY967-20.6%-31.6%
Sacramento, CA3,111-3.4%-12.8%
Salt Lake City, UT879-40.0%-51.3%
San Antonio, TX3,401-15.2%1.3%
San Diego, CA3,204-11.9%-14.4%
San Francisco, CA1,33515.4%-29.4%
San Jose, CA1,550-9.1%-11.4%
Seattle, WA5,3550.4%-6.3%
St. Louis, MO2,345-37.0%-49.0%
Tacoma, WA1,734-5.7%9.1%
Tampa, FL6,535-6.1%3.2%
Tucson, AZ1,7191.5%-6.8%
Tulsa, OK1,540-17.0%-2.4%
Honolulu, HI907-8.0%3.7%
Virginia Beach, VA2,812-15.5%-0.8%
Warren, MI4,417-14.0%-2.9%
Washington, D.C.7,7810.9%-8.0%
West Palm Beach, FL3,173-0.5%-16.1%
Worcester, MA1,3990.4%-5.7%
National631,800-2.3%-9.0%

All Homes for Sale

Redfin MetroAll Homes for SaleMonth-Over-MonthYear-Over-Year
Albany, NY3,174-7.8%-13.6%
Allentown, PA1,642-21.7%-37.7%
Anaheim, CA6,550-12.9%-35.8%
Atlanta, GA21,830-9.4%-25.2%
Austin, TX9,426-3.5%3.3%
Bakersfield, CA2,249-2.7%-8.1%
Baltimore, MD10,451-6.3%-7.1%
Baton Rouge, LA1,828-21.1%-52.6%
Birmingham, AL4,567-8.8%-21.0%
Boston, MA12,6797.5%-15.1%
Bridgeport, CT5,194-7.4%-28.5%
Buffalo, NY2,394-15.6%-21.7%
Camden, NJ4,918-8.9%-9.4%
Charleston, SC5,308-1.0%-22.8%
Charlotte, NC9,350-14.8%-36.0%
Chicago, IL31,391-4.1%-10.2%
Cincinnati, OH9,198-4.4%-5.2%
Cleveland, OH8,411-4.9%-6.7%
Columbus, OH8,690-5.3%0.3%
Dallas, TX15,451-8.6%-23.4%
Dayton, OH3,028-3.9%-4.9%
Denver, CO9,919-4.4%-14.2%
Detroit, MI6,3910.3%-1.4%
El Paso, TX2,414-7.8%-24.5%
Elgin, IL2,511-10.5%-15.5%
Fort Lauderdale, FL10,676-7.8%-35.4%
Fort Worth, TX7,741-6.9%-17.4%
Frederick, MD4,380-2.7%-2.1%
Fresno, CA1,795-4.3%-4.0%
Grand Rapids, MI2,744-4.7%-14.2%
Greensboro, NC2,081-13.4%-32.6%
Greenville, SC3,886-4.4%-19.8%
Hartford, CT5,153-5.3%-20.1%
Houston, TX27,563-5.7%-10.2%
Indianapolis, IN6,603-7.8%-17.0%
Jacksonville, FL7,444-6.1%-18.8%
Kansas City, MO8,063-7.7%-7.5%
Knoxville, TN4,084-5.3%-13.6%
Lake County, IL3,664-10.3%-17.3%
Las Vegas, NV10,634-4.2%-22.3%
Los Angeles, CA19,577-7.7%-20.5%
Louisville, KY4,468-2.4%-9.7%
McAllen, TX1,719-6.0%-19.4%
Memphis, TN3,235-10.2%-7.4%
Miami, FL15,347-4.0%-21.8%
Milwaukee, WI7,353-4.8%-1.5%
Minneapolis, MN14,368-3.7%-10.3%
Montgomery County, PA6,213-7.7%-15.6%
Nashville, TN8,502-0.8%-28.6%
Nassau County, NY9,782-5.3%-25.6%
New Brunswick, NJ10,510-5.0%-21.4%
New Haven, CT3,946-6.6%-18.9%
New Orleans, LA3,530-18.5%-25.1%
New York, NY37,536-2.0%-21.5%
Newark, NJ8,179-3.3%-18.3%
North Port, FL4,037-4.7%-42.6%
Oakland, CA5,742-4.3%-3.7%
Oklahoma City, OK5,040-7.2%-9.8%
Omaha, NE2,438-3.2%-10.6%
Orlando, FL9,513-6.8%-28.3%
Oxnard, CA2,134-6.6%-26.3%
Philadelphia, PA9,096-2.2%-6.7%
Phoenix, AZ19,636-5.8%-15.4%
Pittsburgh, PA10,328-3.3%-5.9%
Portland, OR7,948-4.1%-8.0%
Providence, RI5,668-3.7%-13.3%
Raleigh, NC5,733-3.1%-30.0%
Richmond, VA3,710-8.8%-12.5%
Riverside, CA15,342-3.1%-11.1%
Rochester, NY1,594-26.4%-46.9%
Sacramento, CA6,141-4.6%-11.9%
Salt Lake City, UT2,084-25.9%-50.3%
San Antonio, TX8,494-8.1%-16.3%
San Diego, CA6,546-11.8%-21.6%
San Francisco, CA2,9710.2%-38.0%
San Jose, CA3,057-10.4%-22.6%
Seattle, WA8,616-5.1%-21.2%
St. Louis, MO7,395-21.2%-36.4%
Tacoma, WA2,953-5.8%2.6%
Tampa, FL12,173-6.6%-20.3%
Tucson, AZ4,4231.0%-12.6%
Tulsa, OK3,327-8.0%-12.2%
Honolulu, HI3,133-6.7%-21.0%
Virginia Beach, VA6,764-10.7%-1.4%
Warren, MI10,282-4.9%-7.9%
Washington, D.C.18,884-3.2%-0.1%
West Palm Beach, FL9,665-4.2%-38.8%
Worcester, MA2,9890.2%-6.6%
National1,384,200-2.0%-19.0%

Median Off-Market Redfin Estimate

Redfin MetroEstimateMonth-Over-MonthYear-Over-Year
Albany, NY$232,7001.8%13.8%
Allentown, PA$263,7005.5%19.8%
Anaheim, CA$919,3004.7%22.2%
Atlanta, GA$301,6005.8%25.2%
Austin, TX$463,30010.5%48.9%
Bakersfield, CA$248,7007.5%21.2%
Baltimore, MD$326,5003.9%16.6%
Baton Rouge, LA$145,400-1.8%9.8%
Birmingham, AL$162,4002.8%16.0%
Boston, MA$616,9002.1%13.4%
Bridgeport, CT$462,6004.8%16.9%
Buffalo, NY$187,5004.5%19.0%
Camden, NJ$267,0006.1%23.9%
Charleston, SC$296,8005.2%20.7%
Charlotte, NC$282,7006.3%28.7%
Chicago, IL$284,300-2.5%6.0%
Cincinnati, OH$207,0005.7%20.2%
Cleveland, OH$173,3004.2%17.4%
Columbus, OH$244,9005.5%17.9%
Dallas, TX$332,4007.5%25.6%
Dayton, OH$158,5006.4%21.4%
Denver, CO$524,2007.0%22.1%
Detroit, MI$128,9003.4%19.7%
Elgin, IL$258,500-1.7%9.3%
Fort Lauderdale, FL$329,1004.3%17.0%
Fort Worth, TX$281,9007.2%23.9%
Frederick, MD$493,5003.6%15.9%
Fresno, CA$341,1007.2%25.6%
Grand Rapids, MI$237,6009.7%32.0%
Greensboro, NC$176,8005.1%23.0%
Greenville, SC$201,9006.0%21.2%
Hartford, CT$269,5007.6%18.1%
Houston, TX$248,7006.0%21.2%
Indianapolis, IN$209,8006.7%21.6%
Jacksonville, FL$275,0006.6%25.4%
Kansas City, MO$233,1007.6%22.5%
Knoxville, TN$232,0005.4%24.5%
Lake County, IL$246,800-0.2%9.8%
Las Vegas, NV$362,8005.7%24.3%
Los Angeles, CA$801,5005.0%20.5%
Louisville, KY$195,100-0.9%6.1%
Memphis, TN$184,9003.1%19.2%
Miami, FL$382,7005.6%18.7%
Milwaukee, WI$252,6005.5%16.5%
Minneapolis, MN$328,8005.2%16.0%
Montgomery County, PA$396,0004.8%18.0%
Nashville, TN$354,1007.5%23.3%
Nassau County, NY$581,2003.6%16.1%
New Brunswick, NJ$431,1005.3%21.0%
New Haven, CT$277,6007.7%21.9%
New Orleans, LA$195,700-0.5%10.8%
Newark, NJ$439,3001.9%16.1%
North Port, FL$312,7008.6%28.5%
Oakland, CA$1,002,7005.5%25.1%
Oklahoma City, OK$177,0005.7%16.8%
Omaha, NE$231,2003.6%17.1%
Orlando, FL$296,2007.5%22.2%
Oxnard, CA$754,7005.7%22.2%
Philadelphia, PA$230,8001.5%15.1%
Phoenix, AZ$396,90011.8%39.3%
Pittsburgh, PA$158,7003.2%12.8%
Portland, OR$499,4005.9%20.9%
Providence, RI$371,3004.8%20.7%
Raleigh, NC$336,9008.8%26.1%
Richmond, VA$279,6002.4%13.7%
Riverside, CA$452,6007.2%31.1%
Rochester, NY$176,5004.7%17.0%
Sacramento, CA$549,5008.0%28.3%
Salt Lake City, UT$500,40011.7%34.6%
San Antonio, TX$231,4006.9%21.5%
San Diego, CA$795,5005.4%26.1%
San Francisco, CA$1,531,9003.7%11.3%
San Jose, CA$1,436,4005.1%21.8%
Seattle, WA$724,8005.1%23.1%
St. Louis, MO$181,9005.3%10.5%
Tacoma, WA$490,2006.5%27.1%
Tampa, FL$282,4008.1%23.1%
Tucson, AZ$270,5004.8%26.6%
Tulsa, OK$155,5002.6%12.8%
Honolulu, HI$819,9003.0%16.4%
Virginia Beach, VA$273,3003.0%13.2%
Warren, MI$257,1004.2%17.0%
Washington, D.C.$476,6003.5%15.4%
West Palm Beach, FL$344,6005.8%21.4%
Worcester, MA$350,9004.9%19.9%
National$381,9007.3%19.9%

read more…

redfin.com/news/

New home sales rise 66% | Armonk Real Estate

New home sales reversed direction in March, fully recovering from the 18.2 percent nosedive those sales took in February. The Census Bureau said sales of newly constructed homes rose 20.7 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.021 million units. This is 66.8 percent higher than the sales 612,000 unit pace in March 2020, although that rate was impacted by the pandemic shutdowns and was the highest annual sales rate since 2005.

February’s loss was also smaller than originally reported. Those sales were revised from 775,000 to 846,000 units.

Analysts’ estimates fell far short of the numbers reported. Those polled by Econoday had projected sales in a range of 820,000 to 950,000. The consensus was 887,000.

On a non-adjusted basis there were 97,000 new homes sold during the month, up from 70,000 the previous month. For the year to date sales have totaled 243,000 homes, a 34.4 percent increase over the 181,000 sales in the first three months of 2020.

The median price of a home sold in March was $330,800 and the average price was $397,800. In March 2020, the respective sales prices were $328,200 and $375,400.

At the end of the reporting period there were an estimated 307,000 new homes available for sale, identical to the inventory in February. However, due to the higher rate of sales this was estimated at a 3.6 month supply, down from 4.4 months in February. In March 2020, the supply was over 6 months.

Sales increased by double digits month over month in three of the four major regions but fell by double digits in the West where they were also down on an annual basis. The increase in the Northeast was 20 percent compared to February and 108.7 percent higher than the prior March. Sales in the Midwest rose 30.7 percent and 78.4 percent for the two periods.

The South posted a 40.2 percent gain for the month and 90.1 percent year-over-year. Sales in the West, which also posted poor March numbers for existing home sales, were down 30.0 percent from the prior month and dipped 2.0 percent from the year earlier level.

read more…

http://www.mortgagenewsdaily.com/04232021_new_home_sales.asp

Mortgage rates average 2.73% | Armonk Real Estate

Freddie Mac released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey (PMMS), showing that the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 2.73 percent.

“It’s a tale of two economies. The services economy remains in the doldrums, but the production side of the economy remains strong,” said Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s Chief Economist. “New COVID-19 cases are receding, which is encouraging and that has led to a rise in Treasury rates. But, the run-up in Treasury rates has not impacted mortgage rates yet, which have held firm.”

Khater continued, “The residential real estate market remains solid given healthy purchase demand while implied real-time home price growth is high, due to the inventory shortage that is plaguing the housing market.”

News Facts

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 2.73 percent with an average 0.7 point for the week ending February 11, 2021, unchanged from last week. A year ago at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 3.47 percent.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 2.19 percent with an average 0.6 point, down from last week when it averaged 2.21 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 2.97 percent.
  • 5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 2.79 percent with an average 0.2 point, up slightly from last week when it averaged 2.78 percent. A year ago at this time, the 5-year ARM averaged 3.28 percent.

Lumber prices hit record levels | Armonk Real Estate

A stack of lumber rests on the back of a returns truck
A stack of lumber rests on the back of a returns truck Oct. 28 at the Boone County Lumber Company in Columbia. These planks will be examined before they either end up in the trash or back in the warehouse.

Homeowners looking to add a deck, renovate their kitchen or build a new home likely noticed how expensive the price of building is. The reason: In late summer, lumber prices were the highest they have ever been. And even though those prices have started to fall, it’s unclear when construction costs will follow suit.

In September, the price of lumber reached a record of almost $1,000 per thousand board feet, a quantity equivalent to about 190 eight-foot two-by-fours, according to Random Lengths, a trade publication for the wood products industry. That was nearly triple the price from last year, when the same amount of wood sold for about $360. Lumber was selling at around $550 per thousand board feet as of Nov. 10, according to Business Insider data. Those fluctuations have left lumber yards and homebuilders navigating whether to increase prices or absorb losses. Meanwhile, many new construction home buyers are still paying elevated costs.

Boone County Lumber in Columbia, which sells materials primarily to home builders and commercial contractors, has paid more for wood and had to increase its prices in response. Lumber for a job the yard provided materials for in September cost $18,000 more than the products would have for the same job in March, according to owner Brad Eiffert.

Eiffert said he typically sees lumber prices move by $5 or $10 per thousand board feet over one week. Over the summer, weekly prices jumped by $70 to $100 per thousand board feet. They then dropped back down by the same amount in October.

“No one, living or dead, has seen what happened,” said Eiffert, whose father owned his lumber yard before him.

Costs for lumber yards have begun to fall as mills catch up to the demand. Seasonality has also affected demand some, as colder weather deters the number of projects contractors can handle and typically causes yards to lower their inventories, Eiffert said. However, several Missouri home builders say they have had to raise their prices as recently as October in reaction to skyrocketing lumber costs.

A ‘decade-long train wreck’

What caused the surge of lumber prices during the spring and summer? Many factors over the years are to blame.

“This is a decade-long train wreck that came to meet us in the summer of 2020,” Eiffert said.

First, years of pine beetle destruction of forests caused many lumber producers to quickly cut down and sell a large supply of trees in order to salvage as much product as possible. By June 2019, this supply of trees was already dwindling, according to a Random Lengths report from that month.

This lowered the amount of trees needing to be processed, which caused several mills to close last year as demand waned. Log prices rose.

Additionally, in 2017, the Trump administration imposed tariffs of about 20% on lumber shipments from Canada, a major source of the wood used to build American homes.

Now, COVID-19 has caused even more mills to close, especially at the beginning of the pandemic when buyers’ demand slowed as they assessed how to proceed in a virus-struck world, according to a Random Lengths report. The last thing on mills operators’ minds was production, Eiffert said, because they doubted people would want to build when they were worried about a pandemic.

Additional hits to the timber industry include Hurricane Laura, which caused damage and power outages in mills in the South when it hit at the end of August and the raging wildfires in the West that have devastated many forests, according to an Aug. 28 Random Lengths report. The fires especially have caused mill shutdowns.

All of these elements have created a small supply of lumber that can hardly keep up with customers’ demand, which grew through the spring and summer. The result was lumber prices reaching record highs.

Pandemic-driven demand

As it turns out, a pandemic is the perfect time to build. There has been a large demand for home construction and improvements both in Missouri and nationwide since people have spent more time at home.

“Instead of vacation, (people) built decks or they resided their homes,” Eiffert said.

Columbia-based New Beginnings Construction, which remodels and builds homes, has been booked with jobs, especially decks, kitchens and bathrooms, owner Nathan Goen said.

“The demand for work in Columbia is so great that every single construction company I know is booked out months in advance,” he said.

In fact, New Beginnings has been looking to hire more carpenters to keep up with all the work. Goen has had trouble finding people interested in the role, but he said he would hire if he found qualified candidates.

With all of the demand, the existing lumber supply hasn’t been able to keep up, Eiffert said. He has had new customers come to his yard because bigger retailers were out of what they were looking for.

“For the first time that I can remember, there were just actual shortages of product,” Eiffert said. “They just weren’t there to satisfy customer needs.”

Eiffert said the current demand for housing isn’t that high relative to the longer-term trend. It’s the abnormally low activity from the last few years that “makes it feel so strange,” he said.

Homes have been under-built for years, according to an August report by First Trust Advisors. Builders have started about 1 million units per year in the U.S. since 2010, but 1.5 million starts per year would be more on target for U.S. market needs.

“Home builders still need to make up for lost time, until the long-term average is closer to 1.5 million per year, which could mean reaching, and then averaging, a pace of something like 1.8 million starts for the next several years,” according to the First Trust report.

U.S. housing starts approached that pace of 1.5 million in September, reaching an annualized rate of 1.42 million, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. The rate is not above historical averages but, rather, approaches levels seen before the 2008 financial crisis, according to data from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

FRED Housing Starts Graph

The interest for building new homes now is due, in part, to the increased price of real estate, said Brian Toohey, chief executive officer of the Columbia Board of REALTORS. The inventory of homes available is lower than usual — in September, it was down 50% from last year — causing the price of an existing home to be comparable to that of a new build.

Navigating price changes

Goen has had to raise New Beginnings’ construction prices to account for the increased lumber costs. Despite those costs, he tries to keep prices low to remain competitive.

“We could have made a little bit more money, so we’ve lost a little in that respect,” Goen said.

But there comes a point when absorbing higher costs begins to hurt the home building business. Consort Homes in St. Louis has had to raise its construction prices incrementally over the last few months in order to remain profitable, said Bill Wannstedt, the builder’s vice president and division manager. Each month, the company has raised prices by 1% to 1.5%, he said.

Consort didn’t initially raise prices because it wasn’t sure how long lumber price increases were going to last. Like many other builders, Consort keeps prices the same for 90 days, so it will not increase prices again the rest of the year. This helps keep consistency with projects.

Higher prices have affected homeowners with smaller budgets more, Wannstedt said. This has caused the number of people who walk into Consort Homes to fall drastically. Wannstedt said he saw his customers per week fall to eight from 27 in September after the company raised prices recently.

The next few months

Goen has encountered customers who want to wait until January to start additions in hopes prices will come down. However, it’s unclear whether they will. Wannstedt said that while lumber prices may fall, prices of materials such as appliances and cabinets, as well as the cost of carpenter compensation, could increase at the start of the new year. So it’s possible construction prices could hold steady.

Dean Klempke, a real estate agent at Iron Gate Real Estate in Columbia, recommends that people interested in buying new construction homes should do so now because prices may rise another $5,000 to $10,000 next year.

Buyers may also pay lower prices by purchasing inventory homes, Wannstedt said. These are houses that started earlier this summer and are sold now reflecting the prices builders paid for lumber and other materials then. Buyers of those homes may have to sacrifice choosing amenities such as countertop material or flooring, but they also can save a few thousand dollars.

Eiffert expects prices of lumber to continue to fall and stay at moderate levels for the rest of the year. Although prices have been falling at historic rates after hitting record highs, he doubts they will reach record lows.

“If things get fairly inexpensive after what we’ve lived through this summer, I think people are going to be willing to step in fairly aggressively and have more inventory on the shelf just as a protective measure,” Eiffert said.

read more…

https://www.columbiamissourian.com/news/missouri_business/

Can’t pay your rent? There are options | Armonk Real Estate

Many renters are struggling financially due to the coronavirus pandemic. And though a new eviction moratorium prevents you from being removed from your home, it doesn’t cover rent payments or help lighten the load financially.

If you’re having a hard time paying your rent during the COVID-19 pandemic, here’s what you need to know.

Know Your Rights as a Renter 

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued a federal eviction moratorium in early September 2020. Under the new rule, qualified renters can’t be evicted through Dec. 31, 2020. 

To be eligible, you have to self-certify—under penalty of perjury—that you:

  • Are unable to pay rent due to substantial income loss, loss of hours, a layoff, or high medical bills
  • Have made all efforts to obtain government rent assistance
  • Expect to earn $99,000 or less for the year ($198,000 is you file your tax returns jointly), were not required to report any income in 2019 to the IRS, or received a stimulus check per the CARES Act
  • Are attempting to make at least partial payments on your rent when possible
  • Would likely become homeless if evicted or would need to live in very close quarters with someone

This all must be certified on the official declaration form from the CDC. You must then submit it to your landlord in order to qualify.1

Unlike the moratorium enacted by the CARES Act earlier this year, this one extends to all renters—not just those on federally financed or subsidized properties. 

Understand Your Local Rights, Too 

Many states and municipalities have also put their own eviction moratoriums in place. In some areas, these moratoriums have already expired, and evictions have resumed for non-paying renters.https://da3ebb9f344d2a4fa693b236fea189a0.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

To see where your state or city stands, check with your local housing department. The National Low Income Housing Coalition also has a list of nationwide eviction and foreclosure moratoriums that can help.

You should also work to understand your rights as a tenant and read your lease thoroughly. Note any grace periods you may be due and what your landlord’s options for recourse are. Your city should also have tenant protections in place, so study up on renter’s rights in your area. Your local housing agency is a good place to start.

Talk to Your Landlord

In order to qualify for the eviction moratorium, you must certify that you’re making your best efforts to pay rent and meet the obligations of your lease agreement. If you’re currently unable to pay your rent, your first step is to talk to your landlord. They might be willing to work with you on payment options.

“Contact your landlord and discuss a deferred payment plan,” Howard Dvorkin, a certified public accountant (CPA) and chairman of Debt.com, told The Balance via email. “This is definitely worth a shot, as most landlords do not want to pay the fee to file a lawsuit, go to court, and find a new tenant.”

Consider talking to your landlord about these other options:

  • Deferred payments: You pay your overdue rent by a later, agreed-upon date.
  • Partial or flexible payments:You are permitted to make smaller, incremental payments across the month.
  • Security deposit payments:Your landlord uses your security deposit toward the overdue rent.

Depending on where you live, you may also be able to pay your rent by credit card. Though this can ensure you’re not delinquent on your rent, it also results in additional credit card debt and potentially more interest paid over time. Make sure you’re prepared to pay off your credit card as soon as possible to avoid further financial distress.

Find Local Assistance 

If working directly with your landlord is unsuccessful, you can look to federal, state, and local resources to help cover your rent. Again, this is a recourse you must explore before qualifying for the September 2020 eviction moratorium.1

If your financial hardship is due to the coronavirus pandemic, there are some resources you can tap for help. First, there are several HUD Rental Assistance programs, which received several billion dollars as part of the CARES Act.2

There’s also Fannie Mae’s Disaster Recovery program, which offers housing counseling and can connect you with additional federal and state resources that can help. Fannie Mae’s recovery experts can also help you better communicate with your landlord.

In addition to these pandemic-specific resources, you can also look to various state-based programs, as well as United Way’s 211.org, which can connect you with various assistance resources in your area. The National Low Income Housing Coalition also has a list of state and local rental assistance programs, but make sure to check directly with your city and county as it may not be exhaustive.

ResourceServices
Federal RegisterEviction moratorium details
Centers for Disease ControlDeclaration form for eviction moratorium
HUD Rental AssistanceRental assistance, help finding more affordable housing, housing vouchers, and more
Fannie Mae Disaster RecoveryHousing counseling, federal and state housing assistance information, support in tenant-landlord communications
State-by-state housing and rental programsVaries by state
United Way 211.orgPandemic-related assistance, essential needs assistance, disaster assistance
National Low Income Housing CoalitionState and local rental assistance programs, state- and city-funded rental housing options
National Legal Aid & Defender AssociationLegal representation
Freddie MacFinancial counseling, budgeting help
USA.govFinancial assistance for food, housing, and bills
Consumer Financial Protection BureauFederal renter protection details

If your landlord does move to evict you, Dvorkin suggested seeking legal counsel immediately.

“You don’t have to have a lawyer in court for an eviction,” he said. “But many cities offer free legal counsel and other landlord and tenant resources to help you understand rights and how to proceed.”

If free legal help isn’t available in your area, check with the National Legal Aid & Defender Association to learn more about your options for free legal representation.

The Bottom Line

If you’re struggling to pay your rent due to the coronavirus pandemic or any financial hardship, it does not necessarily mean you’ll be evicted. Talk to your landlord, identify any local resources or assistance programs you may be eligible for, and fill out the CDC’s declaration form to ensure you’re not evicted. There are many options to help you keep your home and avoid further distress.ARTICLE TABLE OF CONTENTSSkip to section

Article Sources

  1. Federal Register. “Temporary Halt in Residential Evictions to Prevent the Further Spread of COVID-19.” Accessed Oct. 7, 2020.
  2. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. “HUD Allocates Third Wave of CARES Act Funding Providing $1 Billion for Communities to Bolster Coronavirus Response and Relief Efforts.” Accessed Oct. 7, 2020.

Builder confidence at record high | Armonk Real Estate

  • Builder confidence in the newly built, single family home market jumped six points to 78 in August on the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index.
  • Anything above 50 is considered positive sentiment.
  • The cost of lumber is soaring not only because of increased demand but because mills shut down in April and May and did not expect to see the kind of strong demand they’re seeing now.

Potential buyers continue to flood into model homes across the nation, and that has builders feeling better about their business than they have in over 20 years. But rising lumber prices could sap the market’s momentum this fall.

Builder confidence in the newly built, single-family home market jumped six points to 78 in August on the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index. Anything above 50 is considered positive sentiment.

The index is now at the highest level in the 35-year history of the monthly series and matches the record set in December 1998. Builder sentiment plunged to 30 in April, when the coronavirus pandemic shut down the U.S. economy, but it recovered quickly as consumers suddenly sought more space in less urban areas.

“The demand for new single family homes continues to be strong, as low interest rates and a focus on the importance of housing has stoked buyer traffic to all-time highs as measured on the HMI,” said NAHB Chairman Chuck Fowke. “However, the V-shaped recovery for housing has produced a staggering increase for lumber prices, which have more than doubled since mid-April. Such cost increases could dampen momentum in the housing market this fall, despite historically low interest rates.”

The cost of lumber is soaring not only because of increased demand but because mills shut down in April and May and did not expect to see the kind of strong demand they’re seeing now. There have also been issues with transportation and labor.

Of the index’s three components, current sales conditions rose six points to 84. Sales expectations in the next six months increased three points to 78, and buyer traffic jumped eight points to 65, its highest level in the history of the survey.

Builders are clearly benefiting from the severe shortage of existing homes for sale. There were too few homes to meet demand even before the pandemic struck, and now fewer homeowners are willing to list their homes for sale.

Mortgage rates dropped to a record low to start August but pushed higher last week, as Treasury yields rose and mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac increased fees to lenders. Unless rates really break much higher, which is unlikely, the latest increase is unlikely to throw much cold water on the very strong demand for housing.

“Housing has clearly been a bright spot during the pandemic and the sharp rebound in builder confidence over the summer has led NAHB to upgrade its forecast for single-family starts, which are now projected to show only a slight decline for 2020,” said NAHB chief economist Robert Dietz. “Single-family construction is benefiting from low interest rates and a noticeable suburban shift in housing demand to suburbs, exurbs and rural markets as renters and buyers seek out more affordable, lower density markets.”

Regionally, on a three-month moving, builder sentiment in the Northeast jumped 20 points to 65, in the Midwest it rose 13 points to 63. In the South sentiment increased 12 points to 71 and in the West it rose 15 points to 78.

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Private streets in St Louis | Armonk Real Estate

A large and opulent mansion in an Italian Renaissance style is seen behind large stone and iron gates.
The 1909 Edward A. Faust house, seen behind the gates of Portland Place in St. Louis’s Central West End neighborhood.

If you were in St. Louis and wanted — hypothetically — to eat the rich, 1 Portland Place would be a good place to start.

The limestone-and-marble palazzo found at that address looms high above the hedge-fringed retaining walls lining Kingshighway, a major north-south thoroughfare where cars stream by at all hours of the day. But between the busy road and this street punctuated with opulent homes is an imposing stone entranceway with wrought-iron gates — one of many such structures St. Louis has built throughout its history to divide its communities.

Designed in 1909, the 18,000-square-foot mansion was a wedding present for Anna Busch, the daughter of beer magnate Adolphus Busch, whose name adorns the city’s ballpark. The mansion was purchased in 1988 by its current residents, Mark and Patricia McCloskey, personal-injury attorneys whose office is located in another mansion they own a 15-minute walk away. In a splashy St. Louis Magazine feature, the McCloskeys detail their “difficult” two-decade journey to restore 1 Portland Place’s marble staircases and damask silk walls — some of which required traveling to Italy to see the original Renaissance-era palaces that the home was modeled after.

The surrounding Central West End neighborhood is known for its lavish houses, well-groomed residents, and manicured landscaping. But on Sunday evening, the occupants of 1 Portland Place were pacing their front lawn in bare feet and mustard-stained shirts, brandishing firearms which they pointed at hundreds of Black Lives Matter protesters streaming down the sidewalk.

The protesters weren’t there to see the McCloskeys, they were just cutting through Portland Place on the way to the home of St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson who, on Friday, publicly read a list of names and addresses of constituents wanting to defund the police department. (Krewson owns a Central West End brownstone just a few blocks away.) But taking this street became a symbolic moment in itself as the protesters toppled the century-old roadblocks intended to keep St. Louis’ white ruling class separated from the rest of the city.

Although videos show protesters walking through an open gate which appears undamaged, Mark McCloskey told KMOV that protesters “smashed through the historic wrought iron gates of Portland Place, destroying them, rushed toward my home where my family was having dinner outside and put us in fear of our lives.”

“Private property, get out!” Mark McCloskey yelled at the protesters in a St. Louis Post-Dispatch video, emerging from between two-story white pillars and cradling an AR-15 assault rifle, as the crowd began a call-and-response: “Whose streets? Our streets!”

“It’s a public street, asshole.”

“We’re on the sidewalk!”

“This is all private property,” said Mark McCloskey to KMOV. “There are no public sidewalks or public streets. We were told that we would be killed, our home burned and our dog killed. We were all alone facing an angry mob.”

The same gates seen in the top photo are seen in a 1904 postcard that says The Louisiana Exposition, St. Louis, Missouri, 1904.
The 1904 World’s Fair turned nearby Forest Park into a destination, ensuring the status of Portland Place as one of the city’s premiere streets.

Private streets remain a stubborn relic of St. Louis’ Gilded Age. Homeowners paid for the streets and sidewalks to be paved long before the surrounding arteries were maintained by the city. In doing so, they purportedly reserved the authority to decide who could use them, which, according to an 1895 story in the St. Louis Republic, was “a privilege, not a right.” Whether they still functionally or symbolically shut people out — one can easily enter Portland Place just around the corner from the gates — the ornate gates, guard towers, and black powder-coated signs denoting “private street” in gold-embossed serif type dot the St. Louis urban landscape as reminders of these restrictions.

A revitalized movement to limit access to St. Louis streets emerged during the 1970s and 1980s, when the population of the city dwindled to half of what it had been in 1950, largely because white families moved to the surrounding suburbs. By the time Mayor Vincent Schoemehl left office in the mid-1980s, 285 streets had been blocked or diverted, most by decidedly less ornamental concrete bollards known as “Schoemehl pots.” One program, entitled “Operation Safestreet,” was praised at the time for lowering crime rates, though the long-term benefits have been less clear. In recent years, advocates have been trying to undo the closures in an attempt to knit the city back together, but some residents want to keep their cul-de-sac streets, especially the ones concentrated in high-wealth, predominately white areas like the Central West End.

There’s yet another another street-level delineation that keeps the Central West End exclusive: Delmar Boulevard, the east-west artery just a few blocks to the north, creates a barrier known as the Delmar Divide that slices through the city. Historically, neighborhoods north of Delmar were redlined because they were home to predominantly Black communities, while white families to the south received federal loans to buy or improve properties — funneling government capital directly to the renovation of those mansions.

The economic disparities are firmly entrenched. On Portland Place, a 1891 Queen Anne Victorian is on the market for $1.4 million. A few blocks to the north, just on the other side of Delmar, a six-bedroom home built four years later is for sale for $54,000.

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