Tag Archives: Chappaqua NY Real Estate

Chappaqua NY Real Estate

Americans favor owning over renting | Chappaqua Real Estate

close up neighborhood houses

With a homeownership rate of 64.2%, it’s safe to say the American dream of homeownership is alive and well. However, lackluster growth in the sector suggests the market might be turning, especially as affordability remains a top concern.

In a recent analysis, LendingTree surveyed 2,095 American homeowners aged 22 and older about their perceptions of owning a property versus renting.

According to the company’s study, 67% of American homeowners believe owning a home is a better option than renting. However, LendingTree discovered that for many American homeowners, renting is still a viable option.

“About 15% of homeowners believe renting is easier than owning a home, and another 18% are neutral on the topic,” LendingTree writes. “Just 13% of homeowners across all ages wish they could go back to renting, but when broken down by age, 1 out of every 5 homeowners ages 22 to 37 say they miss renting.”

Interestingly, LendingTree says this breakdown is highly dependent on the number of years a homeowner has lived in their home.

“In most cases, the longer that survey respondents have been in their homes, the more likely they are to believe owning is easier,” LendingTree writes. “That changes for those who have owned for a decade or longer. Nearly 72% of homeowners who have spent seven to nine years in their home agree with the statement, compared with 65% of those with at least 10 years in their home.”

Additionally, the report found that age also plays a major role in homeowner satisfaction.

According to the study, 23% of Gen Xers claimed to be dissatisfied with their home purchases, this was followed by 21% of Millennials who expressed the same sentiment.

When it came to Baby Boomers and those aged 73 and older, LendingTree reports that only 14% and 3% held the same regrets, respectively.

Overall, the study revealed that homeownership tenure is a tremendous indication of whether or not a person is likely to return to the rental market. 

“Our survey found that the longer you own your home, the less likely you’ll want to rent again,” LendingTree writes. “Only 7% of respondents who have owned their home for at least 10 years wish they could go back to renting, compared with 19% of those who have owned for three years or less.”

The image below highlights the percentage of Americans who wish to return to renting after owning a home:

(Click to enlarge

LendingTree: Return to Renting

Note: LendingTree commissioned Qualtrics to collect the responses of 2,095 American homeowners aged 22 and older from the dates of March 22-27, 2019.

read more…

https://www.housingwire.com/articles/48981-americans-still-favor-owning-over-renting-but-for-how-long?utm_campaign=Newsletter%20-%20HousingWire%20Daily&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=72449673&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_wf5nhkg1FFSaVfcLLsDAq-vSfamUsKWH6fYQFizfFvEM3FO4rbfwKPtMxpuPxnlua16i-cB9BPHu8neekjPxwT8280A&_hsmi=72449673

Oregon’s new rent control law | Chappaqua Real Estate

Oregon Governor Kate Brown yesterday signed into law a statewide cap on rent increases—the first statewide policy of this kind. The economic rationale is to lessen financial strain on renters, given that housing costs have risen faster than incomes. In many large cities along East and West Coasts, even middle-income families are stretching to pay for good quality housing in desirable neighborhoods. The political motivation behind Oregon’s new law is also clear: Unhappy rentershave emerged as a more vocal constituency across the country, and policymakers in both parties, from Boston to Minneapolis to San Diego, are taking notice.

But Oregon’s new law will not fix the underlying problem of high housing costs, and it could even make matters worse for vulnerable families.

THE U.S. HAS TWO HOUSING AFFORDABILITY PROBLEMS. RENT CONTROL WON’T FIX EITHER OF THEM.

The first affordability problem is that the nation’s poorest 20 percent have too little income to afford minimum quality housing without receiving subsidies. That’s not a failure of housing markets, but a function of the low wages and unstable incomes generated by labor markets. Poor families could be helped by expanding existing programs such as housing vouchers or the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) to cover more poor households. But to fund those programs, middle- and higher-income households would have to pay more in taxes—which state and federal lawmakers have been reluctant to propose.

The second, more challenging affordability problem is that over the past 40 years, the U.S. hasn’t built enough housing in the locations where people most want to live. Metropolitan areas with strong labor markets and high levels of amenities—including Portland, Ore., Seattle, Wash., most of coastal California, and the Northeast corridor from Washington, D.C. to Boston, Mass.—have underbuilt housing relative to demand. The same pattern is true for neighborhoods within cities. Affluent residential areas with good public schools, access to jobs and transportation, have effectively shut down new development of anything other than expensive single family homes on large lots.

The only effective long-term fix to the housing scarcity challenge is to build more housing—especially building less expensive housing in cities and neighborhoods where demand is high. This would require substantial changes to local zoning in nearly every U.S. city. But homeowners are a powerful lobby at every level of government, and only a few bold electedofficials have dared to challenge the NIMBYs.

EVEN WELL-DESIGNED RENT CONTROL POLICIES CAN REDUCE HOUSING SUPPLY, HARMING VULNERABLE FAMILIES.

The Oregon law tries to foresee and forestall some ways in which rent control can push landlords and developers into harmful responses. For instance, when landlords cannot raise rents, they often choose to not provide adequate maintenance. The Oregon law allows relatively generous annual rent increases of 7 percent plus inflation to avoid this problem. Although the bill is thoughtfully designed, any such regulations create incentives for developers and landlords to seek out loopholes. Past research shows that property owners in rent controlled cities are more likely to convert apartment buildings into condominiums. A developer considering building an eight-unit apartment building might revise their plans to build only five apartments, just under the cap set by Oregon’s law—thus contributing less new housing overall. Landlords may pre-emptively raise the rent more as they approach the 15 year mark when controls kick in. Even the increased tenant protections could backfire, encouraging landlords to screen out less desirable tenants—including many low-income families with young children.

FIXING HOUSING AFFORDABILITY WILL REQUIRE COURAGE FROM POLITICIANS, AND SOME SACRIFICES FROM AFFLUENT VOTERS.

Rent control is similar to another popular housing policy, inclusionary zoning, in that it tries to push the onus for improving housing affordability onto for-profit developers and landlords. Self-identified progressive homeowners may be willing to support politicians who advocate these policies. But neither rent control nor inclusionary zoning address the underlying causes of housing affordability, and indeed have the potential to discourage new supply and make the problem worse. Politicians need to be honest with their constituents about the cost of better policies as well as the costs of failing to act. Affluent households should pay more taxes to support poor families, and should allow new apartments in their own backyards.

read more…

Con Ed wants 6% electric rate increase in Westchester | Chappaqua Real Estate

Con Edison has requested a rate increase that, if approved, could have Westchester County customers paying about 6 percent more for electricity each month.

The company filed a rate request with the New York State Public Service Commission Jan. 31, seeking approval for rate requests totaling $695 million for the company’s electric and natural gas delivery systems. The increase would go into effect in 2020.

Con Edison
The utility’s Westchester headquarters in Rye. Photo by Ryan Deffenbaugh

Con Edison supplies natural gas to 1.1 million customers and electricity to 3.4 million customers in New York City and Westchester.

With the increase, the bill for a residential costumer in Westchester using 300 kilowatt hours would rise $6.10, to an average of $114.04 per month. The average monthly bill for a New York City customer for the same usage would increase $4.45, to $81.78. For a typical commercial customer in the region, the monthly bill would increase $80.96 to $1,970.67, an increase of 4.3 percent.

The average monthly bill for a residential gas customer, using on average 100 therms per month, would increase $17.28 to $176.34, according to Con Edison, an increase of 10.9 percent.

The utility said the rate increase would fund infrastructure improvements and other investments in clean energy, energy savings and customer service.

“Our proposal will build on the progress we have made in putting tools in the hands of our customers to help them manage their energy usage,” Con Edison President Timothy Cawley said. “We’re making it easier for them to take advantage of energy efficiency, charge electric vehicles and communicate with us. We’re also improving our response to severe weather events and taking steps to protect the environment.”

Through a rate case proceeding, the state Public Service Commission will render a decision on how much the utility can raise rates. The state is required to provide a decision within 11 months.

“Our number one priority is ensuring utility rates are fair and reasonable, and we will not allow a multibillion-dollar utility to line shareholders’ pockets at the expense of ratepayers,” state Department of Public Service spokesman James Denn said. “Today, Con Edison is seeking a rate increase, but to be crystal clear, one has not been approved.”

The state has assembled what it said is a panel of 50 experts to review the rate filing. The process also allows for public comment, which often draws from industry groups, consumer advocates and large-scale electricity and gas users.

The utility last sought a rate increase in 2016. The company asked the state to approve  an electric increase of $482 million and a gas increase of $154 million. After a joint-agreement involving 22-separate parties, the PSC authorized a three-year rate plan in 2017 that allowed for annual electric increases of $199 million, and a gas increase of $35.5 million in year one, $92.3 million in year two and $89.5 million in year three. The decision, according to the PSC, included measures to boost the availability of energy efficiency and smart-grid technologies.

While Con Edison’s proposal is for 2020, the company indicated in its announcement that it intends to discuss multiyear rate plans with the PSC. A multiyear plan, the company said, could result in lower annual increases and provide more cost certainty. It also agreed to a two-year rate plan in its 2014 rate case.

Among the efforts Con Edison said it would fund with the rate increase is its $100 million plan to increase the storm resiliency in Westchester. The four-year plan would strengthen the county’s overhead electric system. The company announced the plan last year amid public pressure from elected officials after a series of snow storms in March caused some of the most significant outages in company history.

read more…

Climate change tax on real estate in Massachusetts | Chappaqua Real Estate

The plan marks one of Governor Charlie Baker’s most high-profile bids to address climate resiliency as he begins his second term.
The plan marks one of Governor Charlie Baker’s most high-profile bids to address climate resiliency as he begins his second term.

Governor Charlie Baker, a Republican who once campaigned against raising taxes, unveiled a proposal Friday to hike the tax on Massachusetts real estate transfers by 50 percent, and funnel the more than $1 billion it could generate in the next decade into steeling cities and towns against the effects of climate change.

The plan, which Baker intends to include in his state budget proposal on Wednesday, marks one of his most high-profile bids to address climate resiliency as he begins his second term.

But it’s also expected to face heavy resistance within real estate circles, where trade groups warn a tax hike could exacerbate the region’s already steep housing costs.

Baker’s proposed tax increase would add nearly $1,200 in taxes to the sale of a $500,000 home, with those costs paid by the seller.Get Metro Headlines in your inbox:The 10 top local news stories from metro Boston and around New England delivered daily.Sign Up

Baker said the increase to the so-called deeds excise rate could generate anywhere from $130 million to $150 million annually toward a Global Warming Solutions Trust Fund, which cities and towns could then tap through grants, loans, and other avenues for local projects. That could include modernizing public buildings, fortifying sea walls, or improving drainage and flood control methods, depending on a city or town’s needs.

“This is an excise tax that’s basically about property. And the proposal we’re making here is to protect property,” Baker told reporters after unveiling the contours of the plan to hundreds of local officials at the Massachusetts Municipal Association’s annual meeting.

“We think in the long run, the cost benefit on this one is a good deal for Massachusetts residents,” Baker said.

The tax increase, which would need legislative approval, could mean hundreds, if not thousands, more dollars borne by those unloading their homes.

Under current law, a home seller in most parts of the state pays $4.56 in transfer taxes per $1,000 of a purchase price. That means for a $500,000 home sale, a seller pays a $2,280 tax bill. If Baker’s proposal passes, the transfer tax rate would jump to $6.84 per $1,000, meaning for the same $500,000 sale, the tax bill balloons to $3,420.

On Cape Cod, where the excise tax is lower than the rest of the state, the increase is actually more dramatic under Baker’s proposal. The $3.42 per $1,000 of a purchase price home sellers currently pay would jump by 67 percent to $5.70.

As a candidate in 2014, Baker continually opposed tax and fee increases, later allowing that if the state offered a new service and attached a fee to it, he didn’t think he would be breaking his commitment. En route to winning reelection last fall, he reiterated that he is against broad-based tax increases for the sake of “balancing the budget.”

During four-plus years in office, he has signed a number of new fees and taxes into law, including an assessment to help cover the cost of the state’s Medicaid program and an estimated $800 million payroll tax, split between employers and employees, that goes into effect in July to pay for a new paid family and medical leave program. Baker also signed off on a new $2 surcharge on car rental transactions to raise up to $10 million toward training for local police.

Baker defended his pursuit of the tax hike in the new climate change proposal. “There’s no program in Massachusetts that’s going to put a billion dollars on the table to put the kind of resiliency programming in place that we’re going to need to deal with the intensity and the frequency of storms,” he said.

His administration, however, also noted that it has already invested $600 million in programs targeting the effects of climate change.

The proposal is the second major climate-change-focused initiative Baker has touted since winning reelection. Last month, Massachusetts and eight other states announced a landmark agreement to create a system to impose regionwide limits on transportation emissions, the nation’s largest source of carbon pollution.

Within hours, the plan was drawing resistance from the real estate industry. Tamara Small, chief executive of NAIOP Massachusetts, the powerful trade group for commercial real estate, questioned tying the fund to property sales.

“When we have a market downturn, which I think is not far down the road . . . that could affect the amount of money that could be raised,” Small said. “When you’re talking about a 50 percent increase, there’s no doubt that for someone who is trying to sell their home, that’s going to increase prices. That’s going to have an impact.”

The Massachusetts Association of Realtors, which opposes the increase, said efforts to support climate resiliency shouldn’t target only those looking to sell property, said Justin Davidson, the group’s general counsel.

“This proposal would quite frankly increase the cost of housing in Massachusetts,” he said. “We’ll be reaching out to legislators to let them know about our position.”

Baker is likely to have powerful support, too. The plan received a “very positive response” from local officials at their annual meeting, according to Geoffrey Beckwith, the Massachusetts Municipal Association’s executive director, who called it a “common sense funding solution.”

“There’s a direct connection between what cities and towns have to do, and the proposal the governor made,” Beckwith said.

Environmental groups, who have been critical of Baker before, offered cautious praise Friday for this proposal, noting they’re still waiting to see all of the details.

“I think it’s a great signal that he intends to take climate change and climate resilience and adaptation seriously,” said Elizabeth Turnbull Henry, president of the Environmental League of Massachusetts. “Massachusetts has 1,500 miles of coastline. The time is now to be thinking about how we’re going to pay for the investments that we need to protect ourselves.”

Bradley Campbell, president of the Conservation Law Foundation, said he was encouraged by Baker’s plan, but called the money it could raise “modest” compared to the projected need.

“Ultimately, I think there will be a need to look at multiple revenue sources to assure that the cost burden of climate risk is allocated in a fair and equitable way,” he said. “This proposal provides a solid start to that dialogue.”

read more…

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/01/18/baker-proposes-percent-tax-hike-real-estate-sales-pay-for-local-climate-change-projects/1M59Xd7ij90ILDpWwW2j4O/story.html

Higher mortgage rates slow real estate purchases | Chappaqua Real Estate

Information compiled by Freddie Mac shows that mortgage rates continued to increase in the fall. The 30-year FRM – Commitment rate, inched up by four basis points to 4.87 percent from 4.83 percent in October. With the November increase, the 30-year FRM – Commitment rate, was at the highest level since February 2011. As a result of rising home costs, builder confidence in the market for newly-built single-family homes fell four points to 56 in December and affordability was at the lowest level in a decade.

The Federal Housing Finance Agency reported that the contract rate for newly-built homes, inched up 10 basis points to 4.77 percent in November. Mortgage rates on purchases of newly built homes (MIRS) increased by 11 basis points over the month of November to 4.86 percent.

After increasing the federal funds rate to 2.25 percent to 2.50 percent at the December Federal Open Market Committee meeting, the Fed remains cautiously on track to continue its gradual approach to raising interest rates with one or two possible rate hikes in 2019.

Moreover, the 10-year Treasury rate fell from above 3.21% at the start of November to 2.7% at the start of January. This decline will reduce mortgage interest rates. The average market rate, according to Freddie Mac, was 4.51% at the start of January.

read more…

Pre-fabs for all budgets | Chappaqua Real Estate

Once regarded as uninspiring look-alikes with no personality or pizazz, modular homes can now be found in just about any configuration you can imagine, and at just about any price point. Not only that, modular homes have become incredibly of the moment, incorporating modern design and sustainable practices for maximum efficiency.

The problem is, many potential buyers don’t know much about modular homes. That’s why we’re here to clear up any confusion—after all, modular homes make great dwellings for today’s modern families looking for energy-efficient and affordable options. 

NEWSLETTERJoin the Prefab Homes Mailing ListSign up for Prefabs Newsletter

Exterior, Flat RoofLine, Wood Siding Material, House Building Type, and Prefab Building Type Based in New York City, Cocoon9 takes a unique approach to prefab homes, offering a line of tiny homes with high-quality construction and finishes, smart technology, energy efficiencies, and versatile spaces that are ready for the modern market. Their models start at 160 square feet and go up to 480. Although design and production of each prefab takes about four weeks, on site installation typically takes under one week to complete.
Based in New York City, Cocoon9 takes a unique approach to prefab homes, offering a line of tiny homes with high-quality construction and finishes, smart technology, energy efficiencies, and versatile spaces that are ready for the modern market. Their models start at 160 square feet and go up to 480. Although design and production of each prefab takes about four weeks, on site installation typically takes under one week to complete.

Modular homes are built as several large pieces in climate-controlled indoor factories, then pieced together at the site the homeowner has chosen. During construction, modular homes are subject to extremely rigorous quality control standards. The truth is, modular homes are just as—if not more so—sturdy as stick-built homes that are constructed fully on site. Today’s modular homes are made to withstand wind speeds up to 180 miles per hour.  

Are modular homes less expensive than regular homes, and by how much? You’ll be glad to know that another major benefit of prefab homes is that they are generally less expensive than stick-built homes; choosing a modular design can save as much as 15 to 30 percent over traditional homes. Most of that savings is reflected in the much shorter build time. 

Since they are constructed in indoor factories on assembly lines, modular homes are much less labor intensive than traditional, stick-built homes. Be aware, however, that the price you’re quoted for a prefab home often won’t include additional costs like land, permits, site work, customization, and transportation. 

Here, we’ve rounded up a sample of modular homes at a variety of different price points for every budget. The modular home prices featured here are just for the homes. Additional costs mentioned above will apply. 

Modular Homes Under $200K 

No matter where you live across the United States (and even worldwide), you shouldn’t have any trouble finding modular homes under $200,000. Given that modular homes are often cost-effective choices, the modular homes under $200,000 that we’ve included are spacious with lots of stylish customizations.

FUSE Series by IdeaBox – Oregon

Price: $188,000 

Exterior, Shed RoofLine, Metal Roof Material, Prefab Building Type, and Wood Siding Material Constructed with durable Montana timber, corrugated metal roofing, and energy-efficient windows, the FUSE 2 by Ideabox is a 1,360-square-foot modular home.
Constructed with durable Montana timber, corrugated metal roofing, and energy-efficient windows, the FUSE 2 by Ideabox is a 1,360-square-foot modular home.
IdeaBox expertly makes small spaces seem much larger with seamless views of the outdoors, 8-foot ceilings, tall windows, and light, airy interiors. These features make the FUSE series a popular option for modular homes under $200K.
IdeaBox expertly makes small spaces seem much larger with seamless views of the outdoors, 8-foot ceilings, tall windows, and light, airy interiors. These features make the FUSE series a popular option for modular homes under $200K.

Ma Modular – Texas

Price: varies by location 

At 550 square feet, Ma Modular’s "Grand Ma" model is one of the larger modular homes under $200K on our list. Prices vary—modular home prices in Texas for this model are $225 per square foot, bringing the Grand Ma to about $124,000. Modular home prices in Pennsylvania for the same model are somewhat less, at $118,000. Finally, to own the Grand Ma in Florida, you’ll pay about $107,000.
At 550 square feet, Ma Modular’s “Grand Ma” model is one of the larger modular homes under $200K on our list. Prices vary—modular home prices in Texas for this model are $225 per square foot, bringing the Grand Ma to about $124,000. Modular home prices in Pennsylvania for the same model are somewhat less, at $118,000. Finally, to own the Grand Ma in Florida, you’ll pay about $107,000.

Brightbuilt Barn – Maine

Price: starting at $160,000

Kitchen, Undermount Sink, Cooktops, Refrigerator, Track Lighting, Light Hardwood Floor, Laminate Counter, Wood Cabinet, Dishwasher, and Wood Backsplashe Despite the small size, Brightbuilt Homes’ modular homes under $200K are tastefully designed with modern touches, like light-toned hardwood floors and stainless-steel appliances.
Despite the small size, Brightbuilt Homes’ modular homes under $200K are tastefully designed with modern touches, like light-toned hardwood floors and stainless-steel appliances.
Exterior, Cabin Building Type, Prefab Building Type, Gable RoofLine, and Wood Siding Material Brightbuilt Homes has been constructing beautiful modular homes in Maine since 2005. Modular home prices in Maine reflect the somewhat more expensive Northeast market: this tiny but tasteful, fully customized, net-zero energy barn runs about $280 per square foot.
Brightbuilt Homes has been constructing beautiful modular homes in Maine since 2005. Modular home prices in Maine reflect the somewhat more expensive Northeast market: this tiny but tasteful, fully customized, net-zero energy barn runs about $280 per square foot.

Modular Homes Under $100K 

The modular homes under $100,000 on our list don’t scrimp on high-quality materials and stylish accents. At this price point, choices abound, so be sure to find the model that speaks to your individual taste.

K6 Series by KitHaus – California

Price: starting at $80,000

Exterior, Metal Roof Material, Wood Siding Material, Flat RoofLine, Glass Siding Material, and Prefab Building Type The handsome K6 Series, one of KitHaus’ largest models, offers modular homes under $100K. These can be customized to include an Ipe deck and hardwood siding, as well as corrugated roofing. All KitHaus frames are lightweight but durable, made with M.H.S.** structural anodized aluminum framing. 
The handsome K6 Series, one of KitHaus’ largest models, offers modular homes under $100K. These can be customized to include an Ipe deck and hardwood siding, as well as corrugated roofing. All KitHaus frames are lightweight but durable, made with M.H.S.** structural anodized aluminum framing. 
Exterior, Flat RoofLine, Wood Siding Material, and Prefab Building Type Modular home prices in Pennsylvania tend to be lower than in California or New York. But most pricing variations come down to external factors, such as land, customizations, transportation, and zoning costs. KitHaus serves many markets across the U.S., so final pricing may vary.
Modular home prices in Pennsylvania tend to be lower than in California or New York. But most pricing variations come down to external factors, such as land, customizations, transportation, and zoning costs. KitHaus serves many markets across the U.S., so final pricing may vary.
KitHaus modular homes offer modern touches, like sleek, angular designs and vanities made of timber.
KitHaus modular homes offer modern touches, like sleek, angular designs and vanities made of timber.

M.05 Studio by Honomobo – California

Price: $98,000 

Exterior, Prefab Building Type, Glass Siding Material, and Flat RoofLine One of the most popular models of modular homes under $100K, the M.05 Studio by Honomobo offers small-space living with a unique twist; all of Honomobo’s beautiful homes are made out of shipping containers. The M Studio is a 200-square-foot modular home made of extremely durable Cor-Ten steel, which is made to withstand the harshest weather conditions.
One of the most popular models of modular homes under $100K, the M.05 Studio by Honomobo offers small-space living with a unique twist; all of Honomobo’s beautiful homes are made out of shipping containers. The M Studio is a 200-square-foot modular home made of extremely durable Cor-Ten steel, which is made to withstand the harshest weather conditions.
Offering a truly seamless indoor/outdoor experience with floor-to-ceiling windows, the M Studio, like all Honomobo models, can be customized with a variety of upgrades, like this high-gloss white cabinetry and premium countertop.
Offering a truly seamless indoor/outdoor experience with floor-to-ceiling windows, the M Studio, like all Honomobo models, can be customized with a variety of upgrades, like this high-gloss white cabinetry and premium countertop.

Steel Homes Tulip Model – Florida

Price: $80,000 

Steel Homes, a Florida–based modular home company, faces a unique problem: how to design and build a modular home that can withstand the frequent hurricanes the state sees. That’s why these modular homes under $100K use light-gauge steel. The high strength-to-weight ratio maximizes building design flexibility and provides rigid structural integrity. Modular home prices in Florida are comparatively cheaper than in markets like California, New England, and D.C. At 1,010 square feet, the Tulip is Steel Homes’ smallest model, with a price tag right around $80,000.
Steel Homes, a Florida–based modular home company, faces a unique problem: how to design and build a modular home that can withstand the frequent hurricanes the state sees. That’s why these modular homes under $100K use light-gauge steel. The high strength-to-weight ratio maximizes building design flexibility and provides rigid structural integrity. Modular home prices in Florida are comparatively cheaper than in markets like California, New England, and D.C. At 1,010 square feet, the Tulip is Steel Homes’ smallest model, with a price tag right around $80,000.

Modular Homes Under $75K 

Go big on style and small on size with our selection of modular homes under $75,000. Though these modular homes may have less square footage, they make innovative use of the space. 

Wings Laneway LW596 by Jenesys Buildings – Canada

Price: $42,000 (shell package only) 

Based out of Canada, Jenesys Buildings offers three different designs of "Laneway" houses. The Wings model is an attractive, contemporary design, with an angled roof, modern finishes, and cladding. It’s a great option to consider if you’re looking for modular homes under $75K.
Based out of Canada, Jenesys Buildings offers three different designs of “Laneway” houses. The Wings model is an attractive, contemporary design, with an angled roof, modern finishes, and cladding. It’s a great option to consider if you’re looking for modular homes under $75K.

Minim Homes – Pennsylvania

Price: $70,000 

Exterior, Wood Siding Material, Flat RoofLine, Metal Roof Material, and Prefab Building Type Minim Homes are wrapped in beautiful, shiplapped cyprus that will gently age to grey. And a 960-watt solar array on the roof can be battery powered, allowing the home to be completely off-grid if desired.
Minim Homes are wrapped in beautiful, shiplapped cyprus that will gently age to grey. And a 960-watt solar array on the roof can be battery powered, allowing the home to be completely off-grid if desired.
Living Room, Medium Hardwood Floor, Bookcase, Coffee Tables, Sofa, and Console Tables On the inside, genius design meets modern styling. Minim offers one of the most innovative modular homes under $75K. The company has won numerous American Institute of Architects awards for their incredibly space-conscious designs.
On the inside, genius design meets modern styling. Minim offers one of the most innovative modular homes under $75K. The company has won numerous American Institute of Architects awards for their incredibly space-conscious designs.

Modular Homes Under $50K 

If you’re looking for modular homes under $50,000, be sure to find a local prefab company to get the most bang for your buck. Steep transportation fees can make even the most affordable modular home prices rise quickly.

Nano by Unity Homes – New Hampshire

Price: $50,000 

Unity Homes, a well-known modular home company in New England, now offers a small home at an affordable price. It’s called the Nano, and at 477 square feet, it’s available for just $50,000. That lands this adorable, energy-efficient cottage on the lower side of modular home prices in Massachusetts and other states surrounding its factory in New Hampshire, where prices are typically much higher.
Unity Homes, a well-known modular home company in New England, now offers a small home at an affordable price. It’s called the Nano, and at 477 square feet, it’s available for just $50,000. That lands this adorable, energy-efficient cottage on the lower side of modular home prices in Massachusetts and other states surrounding its factory in New Hampshire, where prices are typically much higher.

Modular Homes Under $40K 

While it’s definitely possible to find modular homes under $40,000, you’ll find smaller spaces with few customizations. Still, we’ve included some can’t-miss models on our list of modular homes under $40,000.

Bonsai by Bamboo Living – Hawaii

Price: Starting at $17,980 

The Bonsai tiny home is one of Bamboo Living's many homes that use timber-grade structural bamboo as a building material. These innovative modular homes under $40K use bamboo-framed exterior wall panels, which are now available as single-wall (for warm climates) or double-wall (for a wider range of temperatures). On the exterior, the Bonsai uses natural split bamboo siding. Based in Pahoa, Hawaii, the company seeks to protect and restore the planet by pioneering the use of timber-grade structural bamboo as a tree-free building material.
The Bonsai tiny home is one of Bamboo Living’s many homes that use timber-grade structural bamboo as a building material. These innovative modular homes under $40K use bamboo-framed exterior wall panels, which are now available as single-wall (for warm climates) or double-wall (for a wider range of temperatures). On the exterior, the Bonsai uses natural split bamboo siding. Based in Pahoa, Hawaii, the company seeks to protect and restore the planet by pioneering the use of timber-grade structural bamboo as a tree-free building material.

Casa Ti by Green Modern Kits – Virginia

Price: Starting at $30,000 

Designed by architect David Day and manufactured and constructed by Green Modern Kits, Casa Ti is a passive solar, one-story modern modular with a whopping 1,200 square feet and three bedrooms. That makes it one of the largest modular homes under $40K that we’ve seen.
Designed by architect David Day and manufactured and constructed by Green Modern Kits, Casa Ti is a passive solar, one-story modern modular with a whopping 1,200 square feet and three bedrooms. That makes it one of the largest modular homes under $40K that we’ve seen.
The net-zero, off-the-grid prototype is clad in SIPs (Structural Insulated Panels). Green Modern Kit homes come without anything included, and you’ll have to contract your own builder, but the kits are fully customizable.
The net-zero, off-the-grid prototype is clad in SIPs (Structural Insulated Panels). Green Modern Kit homes come without anything included, and you’ll have to contract your own builder, but the kits are fully customizable.

Modular Homes Under $10K 

For the most part, modular homes under $10,000 aren’t stand-alone living spaces, but rather add-on spaces. Consider these tiny spaces if you need an extra bedroom, a pool house, or a dedicated studio space.

K3 Series by Kithaus – California

Price: Starting at $8,000 for an outdoor shower and going up to $60,000 for a larger space with a lofted bed, bathroom, and kitchenette 

If you’re willing to sacrifice space for a super-low price tag in your search for modular homes under $10K, the K3 by KitHaus is an option. It’s adaptable as a backyard studio, home office, pool house, or play room, to name a few options. Its exterior is clad in corrugated galvalume or smooth, natural cement board with corrugated roofing, and floors are natural hardwood or finished plywood.
If you’re willing to sacrifice space for a super-low price tag in your search for modular homes under $10K, the K3 by KitHaus is an option. It’s adaptable as a backyard studio, home office, pool house, or play room, to name a few options. Its exterior is clad in corrugated galvalume or smooth, natural cement board with corrugated roofing, and floors are natural hardwood or finished plywood.

Oregon Timberwerks Cabin – Oregon

Price: $6,000 

From Oregon Timberwerks comes one of the lowest modular home prices we could find. These adorable log cabins make great options if you’re considering a (seriously) tiny home. They’re well insulated and fully weatherproof, constructed with solid wood and plywood. The floors are constructed of pressure treated lumber and exterior plywood, and the walls are covered with tapered lap siding over plywood sheathing and a vapor barrier. 
From Oregon Timberwerks comes one of the lowest modular home prices we could find. These adorable log cabins make great options if you’re considering a (seriously) tiny home. They’re well insulated and fully weatherproof, constructed with solid wood and plywood. The floors are constructed of pressure treated lumber and exterior plywood, and the walls are covered with tapered lap siding over plywood sheathing and a vapor barrier. 

read more…


https://www.dwell.com/article/modular-home-prices-4f640bf9?utm_medium=email&utm_source=postup&utm_campaign=Contemporary,%20cool,%20and%20cost-effective.&list=1

Case Shiller prices up 5.8% | Chappaqua Real Estate

  • Nationally, prices rose 5.8 percent in August compared with August 2017, according to the S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller home prices index. That is less than the 6 percent annual gain in July.
  • The index’s 10-City Composite rose 5.1 percent annually, down from 5.5 percent in the previous month. The 20-City Composite posted a 5.5 percent year-over-year gain, down from 5.9 percent in the previous month.
  • “Following reports that home sales are flat to down, price gains are beginning to moderate,” David M. Blitzer, managing director and chairman of the index committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices, said in a release.
GS: Real estate agent and prospective buyer in house 091001

A real estate agent shows a home for sale to a prospective buyer in Miami.Getty Images

Mortgage interest rates didn’t begin their recent surge until the start of September, but home prices were already feeling pressure, as fewer people could afford what was for sale.

Nationally, prices rose 5.8 percent in August compared with August 2017, according to the S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller home prices index. That is less than the 6 percent annual gain in July.

The index’s 10-City Composite rose 5.1 percent annually, down from 5.5 percent in the previous month. The 20-City Composite posted a 5.5 percent year-over-year gain, down from 5.9 percent in the previous month.

“Following reports that home sales are flat to down, price gains are beginning to moderate,” David M. Blitzer, managing director and chairman of the index committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices, said in a release. “Rising prices may be pricing some potential home buyers out of the market, especially when combined with mortgage rates approaching 5 percent for 30-year fixed rate loans.”

WATCH NOWVIDEO00:46Pending home sales inch up

The jump in mortgage interest rates began at the start of September, but home sales were already slowing, as prices were just too high for some buyers, especially entry-level buyers. Home prices have been pushed higher over the past few years due to a critical shortage of homes for sale. Inventory, however, finally began to rise in August, and continues to gain this fall. Not only are there more listings, but fewer sales, so homes are sitting on the market longer.

The market is beginning to balance more between supply and demand, following one of the strongest seller’s markets in decades. There is little concern, however, that prices will actually fall, only that the gains will fall back to more normal, historical levels of 3 percent to 4 percent annually.

“There are no signs that the current weakness will become a repeat of the crisis, however. In 2006, when home prices peaked and then tumbled, mortgage default rates bottomed out and started a three year surge,” said Blitzer. “Today, the mortgage default rates reported by the S&P/Experian Consumer Credit Default Indices are stable. Without a collapse in housing finance like the one seen 12 years ago, a crash in home prices is unlikely.”

Even as the gains shrink, some local markets continue to show price strength. Las Vegas, San Francisco and Seattle saw the biggest annual gains among the 20-city index.

In August, Las Vegas home prices jumped 13.9 percent year-over-year, followed by San Francisco with a 10.6 percent increase and Seattle with a 9.6 percent gain. Four of the 20 cities reported greater price increases in the year ending August 2018 versus the year ending July 2018.

read more…

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/30/home-price-gains-fall-below-6percent-for-the-first-time-in-a-year-august-sp-case-shiller-indices.html

Classic Westchester restaurants | Chappaqua Real Estate

In life before a thousand TV channels, text-messaging and, dare we say, the harsh divide of politics, a host of Westchester restaurants served up hand-formed burgers, red sauce pasta and old-school pizza, minus the wood-burning oven and gourmet toppings.

Decades later, life may have changed dramatically, but these restaurants are still true to their core. 

We asked readers about their favorite “old-time” restaurants and got the following responses. Thanks to all who wrote in with suggestions.

Chicken wings at The Candlelight Inn in Scarsdale.

Buy Photo

Chicken wings at The Candlelight Inn in Scarsdale. (Photo: Seth Harrison/The Journal News)

Candlelight Inn, Scarsdale: Eating here is is practically a rite of passage. If you haven’t had chicken wings at Candlelight, one wonders if you can be called a true Westchesterite. The Tracy family has run this cash-only joint since 1955 where lines often snake out the door on weekends. Yes, you can order something else — they have ribs, wraps, burgers and addictive waffle fries — but it’s the wings, oversized, tender and spicy (though you can order them milder), that make this a beloved institution. Go back in time: 519 Central Park Ave., Scarsdale, 914-472-9706, facebook.com/Candlelight-Inn

Emilio Ristorante, Harrison: Diners feel welcome the minute they step through the doors, no matter if they’re a first-timer or have been coming for years. Open since 1979, the restaurant, in a colonial home, has always been known for its gracious hospitality and Old World ways. There’s an astute attention to detail, starting with the crisp attire of the wait staff — white shirts and ties (this month everyone is wearing pink ties for breast cancer awareness month). Antipasti is brought to the table and explained, branzino and Dover sole are filetted tableside and desserts are wheeled out with flourish. The wine list is extensive, the Italian food authentic and well-prepared, and the owner, Sergio Brasesco, is all about ensuring you have a memorable meal. Go back in time: 1 Colonial Pl., Harrison, 914-835-3100, emilioristorante.com

The dining room of Francesco's in White Plains. Photographed Oct. 3, 2019.

The dining room of Francesco’s in White Plains. Photographed Oct. 3, 2019. (Photo: Jeanne Muchnick)

Francesco’s, White Plains: Many diners no doubt went to this classic mom-and-pop red sauce restaurant with their parents back in the day  (it’s 48-years-old). And guess what? It hasn’t changed. Sitting in the dining room filled with its wood paneling, red leather booths and hodepodge of Italian art, it’s easy to feel like you’re 16 again. Expect lots of pastas along with classic entrees like lasagna, veal parmesean, penne alla vodka, and clams casino. Folks also rave about the pizza. Go back in time: 600 Mamaroneck Ave., White Plains, 914-946-3359

Gus’s Restaurant, Harrison: In business since 1931 and still run by the same family (albeit with a 17-year break in between when it was sold to a group of investors) Gus’s Restaurant, originally called The Franklin Park Tavern, has a reputation for its seafood and comfortable tavern vibe. It’s also known, among long-time patrons for staying true to the mission of Gus Kneuer who prided himself on serving hearty German fare.

Now run by Ernie and Audrey Kneuer, Gus’s grandson and granddaughter (the two bought it back from the investors in 2004), it features many of Gus’s favorites like meatloaf with mashed potatoes, grilled bratwurst with sauerkraut and fresh roasted turkey. And, thanks to the fish market next door, all the fish and seafood is super fresh and filetted every morning. “Everything gets turned over daily to keep the freshness of both our fish and meat products,” said Ernie Kneuer.  There are plenty of  American favorites like burgers, salads and sandwiches. Be sure to look for Gus’s photo which still hangs by the cash register. Go back in time: 126 Halstead Ave., Harrison, 914-835-9804, gusseafood.com

The dining room at Gus's Franklin Park Restaurant on Halstead Avenue in Harrison, pictured Oct. 9, 2018.

Buy Photo

The dining room at Gus’s Franklin Park Restaurant on Halstead Avenue in Harrison, pictured Oct. 9, 2018.  (Photo: Mark Vergari/The Journal News)

Muscoot Tavern, Katonah: The crooked walls and low front door are reasons to love Muscoot Tavern. Another is its friendly atmosphere and the fact that no matter what’s going on with the world, inside this roadside restaurant, things remain pretty much the same as when the restaurant first opened, sometime prior to 1925. Though it’s changed ownership many times over the years, its legacy as a local hangout remains. Try the “Zpaghetti,” zucchini noodles with fresh garlic, grape tomato, white wine and basil, or the Katonah pizza, made with roasted eggplant, zucchini, peppers caramelized onions, truffle oil, basil. Owner Bobby Epstein also likes to mix it up with some high-end specials every night like prime rib or Mako shark. Go back in time: 105 Somerstown Turnpike, Katonah, 914- 232-2800, muscoottavern.com

La Manda’s, White Plains:The no-frills decor is part of the charm — think knotty pine paneling and Formica tables —  can’t help but transport you back in time. Owner Sly Musilli writes on the La Manda’s website that though they’ve done work to improve the restaurant and spruce it up over the years, they also recognize the value of  keeping it as folks remember. That includes the heaping portions of pasta and robust Italian specialties of Chicken Scarparo, Pizzaiola and Zuppa Di Pesce. Plus, of course the super-thin pizza cooked in the same brick oven since 1934. Just be warned, it’s cash only, though there’s an ATM on the premises. Go back in time: 251 Tarrytown Rd., White Plains 914-684-9228, lamandas.com

A cheese pizza at La Manda's restaurant. Old-school Greenburgh staple has been serving thin-crust pies since 1947. Photographed May 26, 2017.

Buy Photo

A cheese pizza at La Manda’s restaurant. Old-school Greenburgh staple has been serving thin-crust pies since 1947. Photographed May 26, 2017. (Photo: Carucha L. Meuse/The Journal News)

Paradise Restaurant, Verplanck:Hungry for a trip down Memory Lane? Paradise, run by third-generation owner Joseph Margiotta, is your place. The restaurant is 70-years-old and though known for its happily carb-laden Italian food, Margiotta said he has tweaked the menu to include more healthier eating options. There is still plenty of old-time Italian favorites like spaghetti and meatballs, eggplant parm, shrimp scampi, and pizza. Giving diners what they like, said Margiotta, is key to their success. “You can come in and not spend a lot of money or you can come in and spend a lot of money,” he explained. “We wouldn’t have been able to survive four recessions if we didn’t offer something for everyone.” Go back in time: 135 Broadway Ave, Verplanck, 914-736-3334, paradiseverplanck.com

Roma Restaurant, Tuckahoe: The third generation of the Tavolilla family runs Roma, in business since 1931. Known primarily for its thin-crust brick-oven pizza and comfortable family-friendly vibe, it’s also a pasta haven with choices of spaghetti, linguini, penne, cavatelli, and gnocchi. Coming here is like visiting the Italian grandmother you never had where meatballs or sides of pasta can be added to any dish and the lasagna, stuffed shells, baked ziti and more, seem to stream out of the kitchen. Go back in time: 29 Columbus Ave., Tuckahoe, 914-961-3175, romarestaurant1931.com

Sam’s of Gedney Way, White Plains: The history of Sam’s is written in depth on its website, detailing how Sam Eisenstein, the 23-year-old son of a Russian immigrant “with a $300 stake and a barrel of faith,” opened his newsstand and soda fountain in 1932 on what then was a dirt lane in White Plains. Back then, a hamburger with coffee was 15 cents and you could get a 25 cent lunch with pie. In 1968 the restaurant relocated to its current spot on Gedney Way evolving from a luncheonette speakeasy to a saloon to a white-tablecloth restaurant. Now run by Peter and Karen Herrero, natives of White Plains, the two have updated it complete with organic food selections, a gluten-free menu and a loyal staff, many of whom have been with them for  years. Go back and time: 50 Gedney Way, White Plains, 914-949-0978, samsofgedneyway.com

The Blazer Burger at the Blazer Pub is topped with bacon, cheese and carmelized onions.

The Blazer Burger at the Blazer Pub is topped with bacon, cheese and carmelized onions. (Photo: Carmen Troesser)

Squire’s of Briarcliff, Briarcliff Manor: This classic burger joint, in business since 1967, is known primarily for its 9-ounce juicy patties, hand-pressed with high-quality meat. Generous portions make it another reason to come, along with the retro ambiance. Like any good tavern, it also serves wraps, salads, steak, chicken and seafood, but the menu also includes gluten-free rolls to accommodate different dietary needs. Just know: it’s American Express or cash only (there’s an ATM inside). Go back in time: 94 N. State Rd, Briarcliff Manor, 914-762-3376, squiresofbriarcliff.com

The Blazer Pub, North Salem: You go for the burgers: hand-formed and meaty, but soon, the nostalgic ambiance with its vintage arcade games, jukebox loaded with Springsteen and scalloped paper placemats win you over. It’s like stepping back into the 1970s complete with a well-worn bar which looksstraight out of the TV show, “Cheers.” Mostly though you’ll love the wallet-friendly prices (a burger is $7.75). The pub is also known for its tomato soup and “award-winning” chili. Worth nothing: the restaurant is the only one in Westchester to  be featured in “Hamburger America,” a state-by-state guide to 200 of the country’s best burger joints. Go back in time: 440 NY-22, North Salem, 914-277-4424, theblazerpub.com


read more…

https://www.lohud.com/story/life/food/restaurants/2018/10/15/17-oldest-restaurants-westchester-whats-your-favorite/1456738002/

New housing in the U.S. | Chappaqua Real Estate

Highlights of Annual 2017 Characteristics of New Housing

Of the 795,000 single-family homes completed in 2017:

  • 742,000 had air-conditioning.
  • 79,000 had two bedrooms or less and 362,000 had four bedrooms or more.
  • 30,000 had one and one-half bathrooms or less and 296,000 homes had three or more bathrooms.
  • 213,000 had vinyl siding as the primary exterior wall material.
  • 204,000 had a full or partial basement.
  • 517,000 had a 2-car garage and 48,000 had a 1-car garage.

The median size of a completed single-family house was 2,426 square feet.

Of the 358,000 multifamily units completed in 2017:

  • 7,000 had a fireplace.
  • 200,000 were in buildings with four floors or more.
  • 235,000 were heated using electricity.
  • 183,000 had one bathroom.

The median size of multifamily units built for rent was 1,088 square feet, while the median of those built for sale was 1,494 square feet.

Of the 14,000 multifamily buildings completed in 2017:

  • 3,000 had 4 floors or more.
  • 1,000 had 50 units or more.
  • 7,000 were heated by a heat pump.
  • 12,000 had wood framing.

Of the 613,000 single-family homes sold in 2017:

  • 544,000 were detached homes and 68,000 were attached homes.
  • 370,000 had a forced-air furnace
  • 131,000 had a garage for 3 cars or more.
  • 149,000 had vinyl siding as the primary exterior wall material.
  • 556,000 had wood framing.

The median sales price of new single-family homes sold in 2017 was $323,100, while the average sales price was $384,900.

The median size of a new single-family home sold was 2,457 square feet.

116,000 contractor-built single-family homes were started in 2017.

The median contract price was $271,100.

What to do in NYC this fall | Chappaqua Real Estate

17 reasons to go NYC

There’s a lot of fun stuff to do this fall in New York City. Take a look at these openings, concerts, festivals, performances and all-around-good-time events to find out why we’re excited (and be sure to mark down on your calendar whatever strikes your fancy).

Village Halloween Parade. Photo: Joe Buglewicz

1. The City’s biggest costume party hits the streets. The Village Halloween Parade of costumed revelers and larger-than-life spooky puppets makes its way through the West Village on Halloween night. Thanks to a crowd that’s often as dressed up as the parade goers, this downtown tradition takes people-watching to the next level. —Brian Sloan

2. Dogs, too, will be decked out. Brooklyn’s annual Great PUPkin canine costume contest and parade is certifiably the cutest and fluffiest way to celebrate Halloween. —Gillian Osswald

NYC Fashion Week. Photo: Marley White

3. Speaking of daring fashion… Spring/Summer Fashion Week is your chance to see all the world’s top designers debut runway looks. Expect standout shows from Tom Ford, Anna Sui and Marc Jacobs. —Christina Parrella 

NYC Marathon. Photo: Julienne Schaer

4. The NYC Marathon is back. Sporting events don’t get much bigger than this November 4 race, during which nearly 50,000 professional and amateur runners run through all five boroughs. There are plenty of great viewing spots along the route, but you’ll see the most action at the finish line in Central Park near Tavern on the Green. —Jonathan Zeller

New York Giants. Photo: Evan Pinkos

5. And don’t forget the other sports. The Yankees look like they’re in good shape for a return to baseball’s playoffs, so go see Giancarlo Stanton, Luis Severino and company during the stretch run. The Mets season hasn’t panned out as they hoped, but September offers the chance to cheer on Jacob deGrom as he aims for the National League Cy Young. Football’s Giants and Jets start up the same month; come October, the season kicks off for the NBA’s Knicks and Nets, and for the NHL’s Rangers and Islanders—JZ

6. But you can have sports fun even if you don’t make it to the park. The Museum of the Moving Image takes a look back at six decades of sports video games —giving you the opportunity to test your chops at a few dozen of them. We’re personally hoping to see Vs. Tennis and Punch-Out. Look out, Glass Joe! —Andrew Rosenberg

7. The concert schedule is packed. Big shows include Jade Bird at Bowery Ballroom (September 26), Florence and the Machine at Barclays Center (October 9), Justin Timberlake at Madison Square Garden (October 22 and 24), Garbage at Kings Theatre (October 27), Violent Femmes at Brooklyn Steel (October 28), Justin Courtney Pierre at Bowery Ballroom (November 6), Spin Doctors at Brooklyn Bowl (November 8) and Tennis at Le Poisson Rouge (November 13). Bring your earplugs and have a good time. —nycgo.com staff

8. There’s an open-door policy. Hundreds of buildings and landmarks take part in Open House New York, a fall weekend (October 12–14) that marks your chance to see the inner workings of structures sometimes off-limits. Unusual places like La Guardia’s Marine Air Terminal and the super-futuristic looking Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant have been part of past programs. —AR

9. You can get a taste of Japan in Sunset Park. Industry City’s new Eataly-style food fun house, Japan Village, will pack 20,000 square feet with ramen, sushi, soba, mochi and everything else you’d ever want to eat from the Land of the Rising Sun. It should be up and running in October. —GO

10. We believe in life after love. Or, at least, a musical about life after 50-plus years in show business. If you do too, check out The Cher Show, a new Broadway extravaganza covering Cher’s life, times and loves. It takes three actresses to play the title role. —BS

“Green Coca-Cola Bottles” (1962), Andy Warhol. Courtesy, Whitney Museum

11. Warhol will get surveyed. The pop artist’s famous works—and some less familiar ones—will be the subject of Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again at the Whitney Museum. —CP

12. So will some of his collaborators. You gotta run, run, run to see the ambitious exhibition covering the origins, music and influence of the Velvet Underground, due in the West Village in October. —AR

Courtesy, Brooklyn Comedy Festival

13. We like to laugh. Alternative comedy’s big fall event is the Brooklyn Comedy Festival (September 17 –23), whose lineup includes Kevin McDonald, Jo Firestone and Nimesh Patel. The New York Comedy Festival (November 5–11) brings huge acts like Tracy Morgan, Yvonne Orji and Bill Burr. In non-festival news, club headliners will include the likes of Leslie Jones (September 5–8), Norm Macdonald (September 13–16) and Tom Green (September 21–22). Enjoy! —nycgo.com staff

14. The Coen Brothers’ latest hits the big screen. The Ballad of Buster Scruggs has its North American premiere at Lincoln Center as part of the New York Film Festival. Originally intended as a limited series for Netflix, the movie has been reconfigured into a feature-length anthology that tells six stories of the old West; the cast includes Tyne Daly, Tom Waits and James Franco. —BS

Coney Island Film Festival. Photo: Norman Blake

15. And there’s plenty more cinema to savor. Foremost perhaps is NewFest, the City’s 30-year-old LGBTQ film festival. Other events celebrating movie magic: the Horror Film FestivalUrbanworldConey Island Film Festival and the Chelsea Film Festival. Don’t sleep on the hip-hop celluloid celebration at the Film Forum, either. —AR

Oklahoma! Photo: Brigitte Lacombe

16. Oklahoma! comes to Brooklyn. Usually the big musical revivals are on Broadway, but this creatively staged and intimate production of a Rodgers and Hammerstein classic is set to play at St. Ann’s Warehouse on the Dumbo waterfront. —BS

17. You won’t have to leave NYC for a day in the country. Celebrate the harvest at the Queens County Fair—which starts on the first official day of fall, September 22. Located deep in the borough on Queens’ last working farm, the fair features carnival rides, hayrides, pie-eating contests and an actual corn maze.

read more…

 

nycgo.com