Local Chappaqua NY farmer’s market this weekend | Chappaqua NY Real Estate

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Fresh Food from Local Sources

9/6-9/12/12

*Specials at the Farmers Markets This Week*

Brooklyn Cured
Purchase any 6 packaged items for $60 and get a free mini-cooler bag
Markets: Morningside Park, Park Slope, and McGolrick Park

Maura & Nuccia
Purchase any two Italian tarts (Crostate) and receive a complimentary bag of biscotti or chocolate cookies ($8.00 value).
Markets: Larchmont, Rye, and Tarrytown

 Mortgage Apple Cakes
$1 off any product in the last hour of the market
Markets: Ossining, Park Slope, McGolrick Park, and Morningside Park 


Newgate Farms
Cherry Tomatoes, 2 pints for $5.00 (regularly $3.00 each)
Green Peppers, $1.50/lb (regularly $2.50/lb)
Italian Eggplant, $1.50/lb (regularly $2.50/lb)
Place your order for a 20lb box of Roma Tomatoes for $30.00 – Great for canning or freezing
Markets: Croton-on-Hudson, Larchmont, Pleasantville, and Rye

Apple Banner Photo
What’s New and in Season Now
Almond Butter (unsalted)
Tierra Farm

Andoullie Sausage
Thornwood Farm

Asian Pears
Jersey Farm

Butternut Pears
Jersey Farm

Brussels Sprouts
Alex’s Tomato Farm

Cantaloupe
Alex’s Tomato Farm

Cheddar Cauliflower
Bialas Farms

Chocolate (Valrona) Croissants
Wave Hill Breads

Corn
Alex’s Tomato Farm
Bialas Farms
Migliorelli Farm

Gazpacho Ice Pops
Go-Go Pops

Grapes
Alex’s Tomato Farm
Locust Grove Fruit Farm

Heirloom Tomatoes
Great Road Farm
Jersey Farm Produce
J&A Farm
Migliorelli Farm
Newgate Farm

Honeycrisp Apples
Breezy Hill Orchard
Mead Orchards

Jalapenos
J. Glebocki Farms
Migliorelli Farm

Jalapeno Cheddar Hot Dogs
Kiernan Farm

Kirby Cukes
J&A Farm

Leeks
Alex’s Tomato Farm


Macintosh Apples
Mead Orchards

Mozzarella 
The Amazing Real Live Food Co.

New Tomatoes
Bialas Farms

Okra
Alex’s Tomato Farm

Organic Heirloom Tomatoes
Little Seed Gardens

Organic Dessert Melons
Little Seed Gardens

Organic Dragon’s Tongue Beans
Little Seed Gardens

Organic Wax Beans
Little Seed Gardens

Parsnips
J&A Farm

Peaches
Migliorelli Farm
Newgate Farm
Alex’s Tomato Farm

Plums
Migliorelli Farm
Alex’s Tomato Farm
Mead Orchards

Pork Loin Roasts
Thornwood Farm

Probiotic Shake & Drinkable Yogurt GOAT2 
in Blueberry 
& Mango/Peach

Valley Shepherd Creamery

Purple Potatoes
Bialas Farms

Rajama (Frozen red beans-Indian specialty)
Bombay Emerald Chutney Company

Red Velvet Ice Pops
Go-Go Pops

Ronnybrook Yogurts: Plain, Strawberry & Maple Vanilla
Amazing Real Live Food Co. 

Salsas
Trotta Pasta

Seedless Watermelon
Mead Orchards

St. Louis-Style Pork Ribs
Thornwood Farm

Sweet Potatoes
J. Glebocki Farms

Watermelon
Alex’s Tomato Farm
Mead Orchards
Migliorelli Farm

Winter Squash
Mead Orchards

Yellow Watermelon
Alex’s Tomato Farm
Newgate Farms

                        Click on a Market to see all vendor and event details…                   

Westchester County    Pleasantville
Saturdays
8:30 am-1:00 pm
Spring Valley
**New Location:
1 Veterans Drive
in Memorial Park

Wednesdays 
8:30 am-3:00 pm
McGolrick Park
Sundays
11:00 am-4:00 pm
Croton-on-Hudson
Wednesdays 
1:30 pm-6:30 pm

Rye
Sundays
8:30 am-2:00 pm
 NYC Markets Park Slope
Sundays
11:00 am-5:00 pm
Larchmont
Saturdays
8:30 am-1:00 pm

Tarrytown
Saturdays
8:30 am-1:00 pm
Morningside Park
Saturdays
9:00 am-5:00 pm
Jamaica
Fridays & Saturdays 
8:30 am-4:00 pm

New Rochelle
Fridays
8:00 am-3:00 pm

Rockland County Hunts Point
Saturdays and
Wednesdays
8:30 am-4:00 pm
Queens Botanical Garden
Fridays
8:30 am-4:00 pm

Ossining
Saturdays
8:30 am-1:00 pm

Piermont
Sundays
9:30 am-3:00 pm

Cooper Park
Sundays 
11:00 am-4:00 pm
 
Market Announcements

Ossining Farmers Market:

Do you love the Ossining Farmers Market like we do?
Do you want to help guide it to its full potential, week by week?
Community Markets is looking for a volunteer to direct our Ossining Farmers Market Committee. We seek someone from the community with great ideas and new connections. 
If this sounds like you, contact us at 914-923-4837 to learn more.

Pleasantville Farmers Market:
Wiltbank will be stocked with mushrooms this Saturday in Pleasantville after a long summer drought. 
Don’t miss out on this opportunity for fresh local mushrooms.

New Vendor in Pleasantville: Ladle of Love Food Truck
Ladle of Love of Mt. Kisco, NY will be serving ready to eat breakfast and lunch items made with local ingredients including smoothies, sandwiches, and other goodies. We hope you’re looking as forward to this delicious addition to Pleasantville as we are!

Queens Botanical Garden Farmers Market:
We are pleased to announce that the QBG Farmers Market will start accepting Food Stamps and will be distributing Health Bucks this Friday, Sept. 7th.

Book Review: Eat the City 
by Robin Shulman

 Eat the City book cover

Much like the Harlem gardener Willie Morgan, who Robin Shulman portrays in her book Eat the City, New York City runs a game of numbers. Everyday we stack the number of years in our city’s history, and with our latest count of over 8 million residents, we add to the number of stories to tell. It’s our fortune to have Shulman among our numbers. In order to be a great storyteller, one has to be a great listener. To gather material forEat the City, she spent several years listening – and then reading, researching, and imagining. Now she offers readers a deeply engaging answer to the question that got her curious: “How do people mark the landscape with their own personal hunger?”

In her book, Shulman walks through centuries of New York City history and personal accounts related to seven staples: Honey, Vegetables, Meat, Sugar, Beer, Fish, and Wine. Each staple gets its own chapter and its own narrative that twills between its first appearance in the city to today’s crafting by living and flourishing New Yorkers.

She anchors her work in astonishing facts. In the Fish chapter, for example, we learn that New York City has 578 miles of shoreline throughout our five boroughs. This number sets the stage for the easy math to follow – with so many waterfront miles fished by New Yorkers from around the world in search of free protein, “tens of thousands of people likely fish each year.” In the neighborhoods of Greenpoint and Williamsburg, a recent poll of 200 anglers found they caught “an average of fifty-seven fish a week: blue crabs, eels, bluefish, and striped bass.” Who knew New York City is a vibrant fishing village? (But don’t grab your fishing pole just yet – Shulman includes warnings about the potential health hazards of fish from NYC waters.)

The most remarkable achievement of Eat the City is that Shulman uses her facts as a launch pad into grand imagination. This is where her storytelling opens up. In the Vegetables chapter, she writes, “As late as 1880, Brooklyn and Queens were the two biggest vegetable-producing counties in the entire country.” This was also during the time when the elevated train rambled between the buildings — “All over the city, the El trains were level with windowbox gardens, and the New York Times observed that passengers passed by close enough to ‘snare a carrot’.” In the simple phrase to ‘snare a carrot,’ she inspires the interplay between concrete and earth that current urban farmers dig to create.

In these small details, Shulman communicates the spirit behind the food of our city. As the leading man in her chapter about Meat, Tom Mylan of The Meat Hook, notes “Food is an art the economy will sustain.” A writer and painter by training, Mylan now teaches the art of butchery in the open air of his Brooklyn shop. Shulman’s book repeatedly tells the story of these two aspects of food in New York City: its livelihood and its imagination.

As Shulman winds down the banquet of Eat the City, she writes, “When I began work on this book, I thought I would be spending time with people who had been shunted to the edges of an overdeveloped city. But over time, meeting people and reading history, I started to realize that people who produce food draw others around them; they are not isolated, but among the most connected.”

This is precisely the beauty of her work, too: In telling the stories of New Yorkers and our food through the centuries and looking to the future — stories by people from all over the world who now call this city home — Shulman serves her readers the nourishment of connection.

Highlighted Vendor

Joseph Fisheries

Joseph Fisheries Corp
Established 2002
Montauk, NY
Owned by Mike Decker

Captain Mike Decker started fishing as a young boy with his Grandpa Joseph Yesalonis. Some of his fondest memories are of the days when his Grandpa would take him, his brother, and cousin fishing on the party boats out on Captree Boat Basin.

In 2002, after acquiring a federally permitted commercial fishing vessel, Joseph Fisheries Corp. was born, named in memory of Mike’s Grandfather. His fishing boat, Virginia and Victoria, or the V&V, as the family calls her, is a 55 foot dragger, or trawler, named in honor of Mike’s Grandmothers.

Joseph Fisheries Corp. is proud to bring the freshest seafood from Montauk to the Community Markets.

Shoppers can find Joseph Fisheries at our farmers market in Park Slope. 

 Day & New Vendors This Week
Larchmont
Flourish Baking Company
Sugar and Spice
Trotta Pasta

Morningside Park
Raaka Chocolate

Ossining
Hudson River Apiaries
Bombay Emerald Chutney Company

Park Slope
Brooklyn Winery
Raaka Chocolate

Piermont
Benmarl Winery

Pleasantville
Kontoulis Family Olive Oil
Ladle of Love Food Truck
Warwick Valley Winery
Wiltbank

Rye
Kontoulis Family Olive Oil
Flourish Baking Company

McGolrick Park
Pie Corps


Community Markets  173 Main Street  Ossining, NY 10562   Phone: 914-923-4837

communitymarkets.biz

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