Daily Archives: June 15, 2017

Westchester Parks this weekend | Westchester Real Estate

WESTCHESTER COUNTY, NY — Looking for something to do for the weekend? Here’s a list of events at Westchester’s public parks.

Friday, June 16
Playland Park, Playland Parkway, Rye – (914) 813-7010
$15 Friday Nights – 5 p.m. – 10 p.m.
All rides $15 from 5 p.m. to closing. Parking fee applies.

Croton Point Nature Center, Croton Point Avenue, Croton-on-Hudson – (914) 862-5297
Riverlovers Pot Luck Supper – 6 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Sign up to help out at the Clearwater Festival. Info at Riverlovers.org.

Muscoot Farm, Route 100, Somers – (914) 864-7282
Muscoot Movies – 8:30 p.m. – 10 p.m.
Enjoy a late night movie in the historic barn. Title to be announced.

Saturday, June 17
Edith G. Read Wildlife Sanctuary, Playland Parkway, Rye – (914) 967-8720
Volunteer Corps Work Day – 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Invasive plant removal, trail maintenance, beach clean-up and more.

Trailside Nature Museum at Ward Pound Ridge Reservation, Routes 35 and 121 South, Cross River – (914) 864-7322
Orienteering for Kids – 1 p.m.
Children ages 10 to 12 can learn how to find their way through guided waypoints along the trail. Registration required.

Cranberry Lake Preserve, Old Orchard Street, North White Plains – (914) 428-1005
Orienteering Scavenger Hunt – 1 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Find hidden flags at the preserve by using only a map and compass.

Marshlands Conservancy, Route 1 (Boston Post Road), Rye – (914) 835-4466
Volunteer Work Project: Removing Tidal Debris from the Salt Marsh – 1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Bring work gloves; hand tools provided. Great for any type of service credit hours.

Saturday and Sunday, June 17 and 18
Lasdon Park, Arboretum and Veterans Memorial, Route 35, Somers – (914) 864-7268
Opening of the New Lasdon Conservatory: “The Rainforest: Tropical Treasures” – 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Grand opening of the new conservatory with tours, entertainment, face painting, food for sale and more. Admission: $10 adults, $5 children. Info at LasdonPark.org.

Croton Point Park, Croton Point Avenue, Croton-on-Hudson – (914) 864-5290
Clearwater Festival – 11 a.m. – 8:45 p.m.
Music and environment festival. Tickets at Clearwaterfestival.org.

Muscoot Farm, Route 100, Somers – (914) 864-7282
Art Show – Noon – 4 p.m.
Works by local artist Hope Friedland on view in the Main House Gallery on weekends through June 25.

Sunday, June 18
Muscoot Farm, Route 100, Somers – (914) 864-7282
Farmers Market – 9:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
More than 20 vendors offer fresh produce and local food products every Sunday through October. Vendors at muscootfarm.org.
Big Equipment Day – 1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
See the equipment that is used to get some of the biggest jobs done at the farm.

Bronx River Parkway, White Plains to Yonkers – (914) 995-4050
Bicycle Sundays – 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. (Weather permitting)
Parkway closes to vehicular traffic for the exclusive use of cyclists, walkers, joggers and those with strollers, from the Westchester County Center to Scarsdale Road, a 13.5-mile loop. Parking at the County Center. Also 6/25.

Ridge Road Park, 287 Ridge Road, Hartsdale – (914) 946-8133
Portuguese-American Heritage Festival – (914) Noon – 7 p.m.
Music and dance, arts and crafts and food vendors.

Playland Park, Playland Parkway, Rye – (914) 813-7010
Father’s Day at Playland – Noon –10 p.m.
Dads ride free, families pay $15 for unlimited rides all day.

More info at parks.westchestergov.com.

Trump’s Labor Department Pulls Obama-Era Guidance on Independent Subs | Cross River Real Estate

The Department of Labor announced today it has withdrawn informal guidance that was widely regarded as an Obama Administration crackdown on companies’ use of independent contractors and of workers who in effect are employed by two companies jointly.

Of those, the 2015 guidance on independent subcontractors raised the greatest concerns among remodelers because it could have forced companies to treat those subs as employees and thus pay payroll taxes, unemployment insurance, and related costs on those workers.

“Removal of the administrator interpretations does not change the legal responsibilities of employers under the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act, as reflected in the department’s long-standing regulations and case law,” the Labor Department’s statement said. “The department will continue to fully and fairly enforce all laws within its jurisdiction, including the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act.”

The July 15, 2015, administrator’s interpretation by the head of the Wage and Hour Division–which no longer is available on the department’s website–basically declared the government will be looking closer at a subcontractor’s economic independence when deciding whether that sub really ought to be regarded as an independent enterprise. That represented a shift from past practices in which government reviews appeared to focus on whether a company controlled a supposedly independent contractor by setting that person’s hours, providing tools, and requiring the contractor wear the company’s uniform.

“[N]o single factor, including control, should be over-emphasized,”  David Weil, administrator of DOL’s Wage and Hour Division, wrote in that now-removed administrator’s interpretation. “Instead, each factor should be considered in light of the ultimate determination of whether the worker is really in business for him or herself (and thus is an independent contractor) or is economically dependent on the employer (and thus is its employee). The factors should be used as guides to answer that ultimate question of economic dependence.”

The interpretation came out three months after the Labor Department announced it had secured consent judgments with 16 defendants in Utah and Arizona who had claimed more than 1,000 of their workers were independent contractors. In that case, which yielded $700,000 in back wages and penalties, the defendants were accused of requiring the workers to become member/owners of limited liability companies. “These construction workers were building houses in Utah and Arizona as employees one day and then the next day were performing the same work on the same job sites for the same companies but without the protection of federal and state wage and safety laws,” DOL’s announcement said. “The companies, in turn, avoided paying hundreds of thousands of dollars in payroll taxes.”

The joint employer rule basically involves whether one company effectively controls all the activities of another company and thus is responsible for what that second company does to its employees. The rule had multiple implications for cases in which contractors used subcontractors and companies related to franchises.

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