Monthly Archives: August 2013

Real estate brokers, fall into line: It’s time to let the MLS lead | Armonk Homes

The power balance in the real estate world is shifting faster than ever. Travel titans, search engines, investment oracles and government entities all want to change the way we do business. Most just want to control a larger piece of the pie.

Real estate brokerages are often too focused on their day-to-day business of attracting and retaining agents to give an appropriate share of their attention to the greater direction of real estate. The reasons are fairly simple. Brokerages are deemed successful by their ranking vs. local competitors as opposed to the greater health of all brokers in their region. The ability of a broker or agent to increase sales production and income often comes at the expense of competing agents and brokers, especially in a down market.  This is not necessarily a negative, but the reality of competitive business and our natural motivations in these roles.

Then, there is the MLS. The multiple listing service could be called the referee for our regional activities. Some practitioners love the MLS for its standardization of practices. Some hate it for its plethora of rules impeding their business. Some brokers appreciate the MLS’s creation of a level playing field vs. other companies. Many brokers feel disdain for any organization that seeks to override its regulatory authority.

– See more at: http://www.inman.com/next/real-estate-brokers-fall-into-line-its-time-to-let-the-mls-lead/#sthash.qPqqrbTH.dpuf

Comptroller Raises Concerns About Bedford’s Finances | Bedford Homes

Town Comptroller Edward Ritter presented a bleak financial outlook for the Town of Bedford at a recent work session.

At the Aug. 20 meeting, Ritter presented a financial outlook for the town for the next five years that showed Bedford facing rising pension and benefit costs that will be hard to keep up with.

Like most municipalities, Bedford has seen pension and health care costs skyrocket over the past few years while they try to keep budgets within the 2-percent cap on the tax levy.

The board is already working on its 2014 budget, where, according to Ritter, the town faces a $692,082 budget  gap for 2014. The gap could reach $2.6 million by 2018.

Municipalities are required to pass balance budgets. Ritter said the town’s fund balance is also running low. Municipalities often use fund balance to help mitigate two percent.

Ritter said employee benefits will rise from $5.7 million this year to more than $8 million in 2018.

At the work session, the town board discussed possibly overriding the tax cap in future years. The Bedford Town Board can override the tax cap with a 3-2 vote.

Supervisor Lee Roberts said, while she is concerned, she believes Bedford is in better shape than most.

“We have a AAA bond rating and a healthy fund balance,” Roberts said. “We have our concerns. It’s not going to be business as usual.”

Roberts said the town board has to be creative with the town’s future financial direction.

“This exercise is going to give us a longer range view of our finances so we can plan and not just have a knee-jerk reaction,” Roberts said. “It was a call for all of the town board to come up with thoughts and ideas on how we’re going to move forward.”

Bedford’s situation is not unique in New York, Roberts said.

“Every town will be required to have a long range review,” Roberts said. “It’s good to have a sense of direction you’re taking and not just be reactionary when things go wrong.”

The town has tried to keep costs down, having cut for the last five years. But along with pension and health insurance costs increasing, replacing vehicles, paving roads and fuel costs have all gone up. Last year, the town laid off employees for the first time in history.

“Everything goes up,” Roberts lamented. “It’s a very difficult economic picture for municipalities. Mandate relief would go a long way to helping us. The entire financial picture is challenging.”

Roberts noted the town has no control over pension costs, simply getting a bill from the state comptroller’s office.

 

 

 

http://bedford.dailyvoice.com/politics/comptroller-raises-concerns-about-bedfords-finances

The Solidity and Stature of NYC’s Central Savings Bank | Waccabuc Real Estate

Welcome back to Curbed Classics, a column in which writer Lisa Santoro traces the history of a classic New York City building. Have a building to nominate for a future installment? Please suggest it to the tipline.

CSBnow_8_13.jpg

Banking and commerce are integral to the city’s livelihood, so it’s no wonder that New York City’s banking institutions are designed to look important. This is certainly the case with Central Savings Bank, which stands out even among the noteworthy classical structures that are its neighbors. The building is easily accessible to the public and warrants a closer look.

The Central Savings Bank (currently Apple Bank), located at 2100-2108 Broadway at West 73rd Street, was built between 1926 and 1928 by the architecture firm of York & Sawyer. The bank had been founded in 1859 and was originally known as The German Savings Bank in the City of New York, with its first location inside the Cooper Union building. Just five years later, in 1864, the bank would move a bit uptown to Fourth Avenue and 14th Street, eventually occupying a new bank building that was constructed in 1872. Decades later, during World War I, the bank changed its name to “Central Savings Bank.” Though the name change may have been due to anti-German sentiment, the bank continued to flourish and the trustees banked (sorry) on the Upper West Side’s business and residential development and chose to open an uptown branch.

CSBold_8_13.jpg [The Central Savings Bank, via NYC-architecture.]

York and Sawyer was an obvious choice for the new building. In addition to both working for the prolific firm of McKim, Mead and White, York and Sawyer were experienced in designing other noteworthy banking institutions, such as the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on Liberty Street and the Bowery Savings Bank on 42nd Street. The Central Savings Bank commission would be especially stately given its unique location atop a trapezoidal lot adjacent to Verdi Square. With the latitude to design a building free from the confines of adjacent structures, and complemented by nearby open space, the designers were able to create a unique, iconic structure.

CSBdoor_8_13.jpgThat structure was a six-story freestanding building designed in the style of an Italian Renaissance palazzo. Constructed of rusticated limestone, the building was adorned with decoration that would in fact be very fitting for a palazzo. This included the two lions surrounding the clock above the main entrance, cartouches featuring the heads of classical figures and shields containing the caduceus motif&151;two snakes ensnarled around a staff—which has become the modern symbol of commerce and negotiation. In addition, the exterior features stunning wrought iron doors, gates, grilles and lanterns designed by Samuel Yellin, considered the country’s master iron craftsman during the 1920s. The building is still not as highly decorated and elaborate as its Parisian-inspired neighbors to the south, the Ansonia and the Dorilton, but is instead serious and refined.

 

 

 

 

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http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2013/08/21/the_solidity_and_stature_of_nycs_central_savings_bank.php

 

New-home sales plummet | Chappaqua Real Estate

After hitting a five-year high in June, new-home sales plummeted in July, according to data released today by the U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Sales of new single-family houses in July dropped a seasonally adjusted 13.4 percent month over month to an annual rate of 369,000, but were up 6.8 percent from a year before, according to the Census Bureau.

The median sales price of a new home sold in July was $257,200, the report said. The report added that the seasonally adjusted estimate of new houses for sale at the end of July was 171,000, representing a supply of 5.2 months at the current sales rate

 

read more…

 

http://www.inman.com/wire/new-home-sales-plummet/#sthash.cSmX6asa.dpuf

The 15 best blogging and publishing platforms on the Internet today. Which one is for you? | Mt Kisco Realtor

Reading the signs a couple of years ago it was easy to assume that the art of blogging was set to die a painful death at the hands of social networks like Facebook and Twitter and others. While social has changed how we communicate online, blogging remains a core part of things.

In fact, the truth is that there’s never been a better time to blog. Social networks help build audiences and deliver content to readers, and more established blogs and websites often link to or aggregate smaller sites, sending swarms of viewers to read articles — The Daily Mail aside.

So, whether you’re a blogger returning from a break, seeking a new home or are looking to write online for the first time, here’s our guide to what blogging platforms are out there.

WordPress: WordPress.com and WordPress.org

tnw1 730x417 The 15 best blogging and publishing platforms on the Internet today. Which one is for you?

WordPress has two options: a freemium hosted service that provides .wordpress.com domains — e.g. jonrussell.wordpress.com (but you can still pay to use your own domain) — and includes limited customization. Or the completey free .org version which allows for you to host WordPress on your own servers with much more control, edit themes to your hearts content, hack code and add as many WordPress plugins as you wish.

It is, in simple terms, the daddy of blogging. The platform powers almost 19 percent of the Web and has been downloaded more than 45 million times.

One of the platform’s core strengths is its community of creatives, who have produced thousands of customizations and tweaks allowing WordPress users to add sophisticated and powerful plug-ins (features) to their blogs, or dress it up in a new layout or design.

Pros: Customization, customization, customization!

Cons: Vast array of options can be complicated for less-experienced users — tread carefully.

Verdict: Still the best option out there. WordPress is especially useful for companies or those looking to develop (or have someone else develop) a sophisticated website

 

 

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http://thenextweb.com/apps/2013/08/16/best-blogging-services/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily

Historically Sensitive Renovation over $300,000: Search and Rescue | North Salem Real Estate

 

Project Info

Designer: Judy Mozen / Handcrafted Homes, Roswell, GA Contractor: Judy Mozen, Randy Urquhart / Handcrafted Homes, Roswell, GA

Priorities

• Restore and repair an exterior façade using similar designs and, where possible, like materials

Launch Slideshow

Design-builder Judy Mozen, owner of Handcrafted Homes, faced the daunting task of restoring and repairing the exterior of the historic Beaux Arts home of Asa Candler, the founder of Coca Cola.

Search and Rescue

Play Slideshow >>

Search and Rescue

  • Design-builder Judy Mozen, owner of Handcrafted Homes, faced the daunting task of restoring and repairing the exterior of the historic Beaux Arts home of Asa Candler, the founder of Coca Cola.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/Images/tmp7C01%2Etmp_tcm17-1999197.jpg

    Design-builder Judy Mozen, owner of Handcrafted Homes, faced the daunting task of restoring and repairing the exterior of the historic Beaux Arts home of Asa Candler, the founder of Coca Cola.

    600

    James Lawrence

    Design-builder Judy Mozen, owner of Handcrafted Homes, faced the daunting task of restoring and repairing the exterior of the historic Beaux Arts home of Asa Candler, the founder of Coca Cola.

  • The homes exterior was in a massive state of disrepair with serious structural damage: wood rot, lack of structural support in many places, brick work that needed tuck-pointing.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/Images/tmp76EF%2Etmp_tcm17-1999194.jpg

    The homes exterior was in a massive state of disrepair with serious structural damage: wood rot, lack of structural support in many places, brick work that needed tuck-pointing.

    600

    James Lawrence

    The home’s exterior was in a massive state of disrepair with serious structural damage: wood rot, lack of structural support in many places, brick work that needed tuck-pointing.

  • After a lengthy search Mozen discovered three brothers in Chicago at Renaissance Roofing who owned an old government press. Handcrafter Homes hand delivered sample of the original metal tiles. The brothers made  on by one  4,240 pieces of galvanized steel tiles, 720 pieces of valley and eave, 257 pieces of decorative hip/ridge, and 4 decorative finials. The pieces were coated in Kynar finish.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/Images/tmp72D8%2Etmp_tcm17-1999190.jpg

    After a lengthy search Mozen discovered three brothers in Chicago at Renaissance Roofing who owned an old government press. Handcrafter Homes hand delivered sample of the original metal tiles. The brothers made  on by one  4,240 pieces of galvanized steel tiles, 720 pieces of valley and eave, 257 pieces of decorative hip/ridge, and 4 decorative finials. The pieces were coated in Kynar finish.

    600

    James Lawrence

    After a lengthy search Mozen discovered three brothers in Chicago at Renaissance Roofing who owned an old government press. Handcrafter Homes hand delivered sample of the original metal tiles. The brothers made – on by one – 4,240 pieces of galvanized steel tiles, 720 pieces of valley and eave, 257 pieces of decorative hip/ridge, and 4 decorative finials. The pieces were coated in Kynar finish.

  • The roof had a major valley rafter cut in the attic that had to be restructured. The valley pitch had to be altered slightly to control the flow of water to the hidden gutters.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/Images/tmp6AB8%2Etmp_tcm17-1999187.jpg

    The roof had a major valley rafter cut in the attic that had to be restructured. The valley pitch had to be altered slightly to control the flow of water to the hidden gutters.

    600

    James Lawrence

    The roof had a major valley rafter cut in the attic that had to be restructured. The valley pitch had to be altered slightly to control the flow of water to the hidden gutters.

  • One obstacle was removing old plaster pieces, which were held together by lead paint and crumbled when touched. Mozen commissioned knives to be made to reproduce the mouldings; they used resins to create the pieces. So much structural damage existed on the columns, capitals, and entablature that they had to be locked together with 2x4s to secure them during the repair work.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/Images/tmp672C%2Etmp_tcm17-1999186.jpg

    One obstacle was removing old plaster pieces, which were held together by lead paint and crumbled when touched. Mozen commissioned knives to be made to reproduce the mouldings; they used resins to create the pieces. So much structural damage existed on the columns, capitals, and entablature that they had to be locked together with 2x4s to secure them during the repair work.

    600

    James Lawrence

    One obstacle was removing old plaster pieces, which were held together by lead paint and crumbled when touched. Mozen commissioned knives to be made to reproduce the mouldings; they used resins to create the pieces. So much structural damage existed on the columns, capitals, and entablature that they had to be locked together with 2x4s to secure them during the repair work.

  • Hidden gutters had leaked behind the cornice and frieze  soaking and rotting the wood all the way through to the framing behind the interior entry hall plaster and gold painted crown moulding.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/Images/tmp6363%2Etmp_tcm17-1999185.jpg

    Hidden gutters had leaked behind the cornice and frieze  soaking and rotting the wood all the way through to the framing behind the interior entry hall plaster and gold painted crown moulding.

    600

    James Lawrence

    Hidden gutters had leaked behind the cornice and frieze – soaking and rotting the wood all the way through to the framing behind the interior entry hall plaster and gold painted crown moulding.

  • Engineer Clint Shaeffer at Quinn and Associates detailed the sizes and spacing of repairs to the structural wooden columns. The new staves were made and hand-sanded into place to preserve the design of the tapered columns.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/Images/tmp5F7A%2Etmp_tcm17-1999184.jpg

    Engineer Clint Shaeffer at Quinn and Associates detailed the sizes and spacing of repairs to the structural wooden columns. The new staves were made and hand-sanded into place to preserve the design of the tapered columns.

    600

    James Lawrence

    Engineer Clint Shaeffer at Quinn and Associates detailed the sizes and spacing of repairs to the structural wooden columns. The new staves were made and hand-sanded into place to preserve the design of the tapered columns.

  • The curved porch demolition exposed a completely rotten structure, and a previous owner had cut joists to install lights and a fan.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/Images/tmp5BEE%2Etmp_tcm17-1999183.jpg

    The curved porch demolition exposed a completely rotten structure, and a previous owner had cut joists to install lights and a fan.

    600

    James Lawrence

    The curved porch demolition exposed a completely rotten structure, and a previous owner had cut joists to install lights and a fan.

  • Mozen couldnt find a ready-made tile that was  porcelain without a bevel. She researched until she found a small entrepreneur who was able to make the field tiles in a snowflake design and the Greek key border. She created a CAD drawing assigning two layout patterns that would allow the craftsman to make one sheet of snowflake and one without  to keep from having hundreds of little tile pieces to install.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/Images/tmp544C%2Etmp_tcm17-1999182.jpg

    Mozen couldnt find a ready-made tile that was  porcelain without a bevel. She researched until she found a small entrepreneur who was able to make the field tiles in a snowflake design and the Greek key border. She created a CAD drawing assigning two layout patterns that would allow the craftsman to make one sheet of snowflake and one without  to keep from having hundreds of little tile pieces to install.

    600

    James Lawrence

    Mozen couldn’t find a ready-made tile that was ¾” porcelain without a bevel. She researched until she found a small entrepreneur who was able to make the field tiles in a snowflake design and the Greek key border. She created a CAD drawing assigning two layout patterns that would allow the craftsman to make one sheet of snowflake and one without – to keep from having hundreds of little tile pieces to install.

  • The porchs tiled floor before its restoration.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/Images/tmp4E50%2Etmp_tcm17-1999181.jpg

    The porchs tiled floor before its restoration.

    600

    James Lawrence

    The porch’s tiled floor before its restoration.

  • The curved porch restored to its original elegance.

    http://www.remodeling.hw.net/Images/tmp4631%2Etmp_tcm17-1999180.jpg

    The curved porch restored to its original elegance.

    345

    James Lawrence

    The curved porch restored to its original elegance.

Solutions

This circa 1910 Beaux Arts home was built for Asa Candler, the founder of Coca-Cola, in Atlanta’s Inman Park neighborhood, now on the National Register of Historic Places. Handcrafted Homes was tasked with restoring and repairing this highly damaged and neglected 10,000-square-foot home’s exterior.

Design-builder Judy Mozen says the team’s greatest challenge came from the requirement to restore using similar designs and materials. “The search for products and in certain instances, for the craftsmen to create these products, necessitated an elaborate investigation that preceded the actual beginning date of the work.”

Mozen created mock-ups when necessary and contacted craftsmen across the United States. She found three brothers in Chicago–Renaissance Roofing—with an old government press who made 4,240 pieces of galvanized steel tiles, 720 pieces of valley and eave, 257 pieces of decorative hip/ridge, and 4 decorative finials.

She discovered a small entrepreneur at American Restoration Tile in Arkansas who was able to make the porch floor’s field tiles in a snowflake design and the Greek key border. To prevent having hundreds of tiny pieces to install, Mozen created a CAD drawing for two layout patterns, one with the snowflake and one without.

Craftsmen commissioned special knives to help reproduce the mouldings and an Excel spreadsheet helped them keep track of all the various designs. They also had new staves made and hand-sanded into place to preserve the tapered columns’ design.

Judges’ Comments

This is a fabulous restoration. They truly restored the exterior of this house using original materials; where there was wood they used wood, they didn’t use fiberglass. You can see the marks in the scrolls on the capitals. How often do you see an exterior tile floor? They restored it and it looks incredible.

This was the best binder in the whole competition. They did a great job of pairing up the before and after shots to tell the story through the binder.

 

 

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http://www.remodeling.hw.net/awards/search-and-rescue.aspx?utm_source=newsletter&utm_content=jump&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=RDU_081513&day=2013-08-15

 

Protect your data from cloud-based storms | South Salem Realtor

The recent crash of the dotloop e-signature platform highlights the challenges related to going paperless and relying on someone else’s server for your protection. Whether it’s your email, your website, your e-signature platform or anything else that you store in the cloud, what can you do to protect yourself from cloud-based storms?

In my recent series of articles on the differences between the various e-signature platforms, I outlined the dangers of using a PDF-based e-signature platform such as dotloop that relies exclusively on its company website to track document changes in the cloud.

When I was researching the articles, I posed the following question to dotloop’s CEO, Allison Austin: “What happens if your system goes down, is hacked, or if you go out of business?” His response cited dotloop’s multiple backup systems and that it would be highly unlikely that that would happen.

When the dotloop system went down, its users lost access. All digital transaction management platforms send users their documents via email, where they can be archived and accessed for future use.

But unlike DocuSign, Instanet or zipLogix’s Digital Ink products that provide the double protection of both a PDF document trail and independent tracking of changes within the document itself, dotloop users had no backup unless they did one of three things prior to the outage: (1) printed the documents to paper beforehand; (2) downloaded the documents into a separate PDF file on their computer; or (3) stored the documents in another cloud-based solution.

It’s not if they will fail, it’s when Of course, whether you are Google, Amazon, Microsoft or any other technology provider, sooner or later the system goes down. On Aug.16, Google went down for a few minutes. The blackout was “unprecedented.” The result: a 40 percent decrease of global traffic on the Web, according to a CNET article.

 

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http://www.inman.com/2013/08/22/protect-your-data-from-cloud-based-storms/#sthash.MlrkSiPy.dpuf

5 Cool Apps to Save You from Social Media Overload | Katonah Realtor

Do you need a break from  social media overload?5 Cool Apps to Save You from Social Media Overload

Your friends and colleagues  are constantly learning about something new, and it’s hard to keep up. The only  way to stay connected was to waste time going through piles of social media  websites, blogs and news feeds.

This torrent of data and  information is a big problem in life today. In order to be connected with the  world around you, keeping across it all and obtaining an understanding is  important.

Curation and control of this data explosion is necessary to keep your  sanity.

Luckily, developers have  been hard at work creating some pretty cool social news apps that will help you  to stop wasting time and to stay connected with what really matters.

Here are 5 cool apps to save you from what sometimes seems to be a social  media overload.

1. LikeHack

LikeHack  is available now and is an intuitive approach to social news. This social news  reader is designed for people who value their time, and it goes beyond a  glorified RSS feed and really delivers some interesting benefits.

LikeHack is appropriate for professional and people who need their news from  many places and quickly.It is designed for busy people because it saves and  stores posts you’ve shared and liked on Facebook and Twitter and learns what is  most interesting to you.

What do I really like about LikeHack?

  • Saves time by collecting everything for you
  • Helps to make sure you only see interesting content
  • Allows you to read the news even without internet access
  • Lets you only use one app for multiple sources of content

Facebook is a busy place, and it is easy to get overloaded and frustrated,  especially with friends posting everything they find online. LikeHack makes  sense of all the information going through your feeds and can figure out what  would be most interesting for you. While doing this, it is also able to get rid  of the annoying filler articles that take up space, which the BBC picked up on  when they wrote.

“Likehack filters out the noise to provide a digest of interesting stories  based on your typical sharing history.”

Lifehack 5 Apps that will change your social media

LikeHack offers a good selection of sources for news including Facebook and  Twitter, but also many industry blogs, which is almost obligatory nowadays.

Even though it is still in the beta stage, Likehack really does deliver what  it says. For social media specialists, entrepreneurs, and people who simply  value their time, Likehack is something worth trying.

 

 

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http://www.jeffbullas.com/2013/08/19/5-cool-apps-to-save-you-from-social-media-overload/#kGpAlR6rRiDMORqq.99

Monday Morning Cup of Coffee: Housing will take a beating | Bedford Hills Real Estate

Monday Morning Cup of Coffee is a quick look at the news coming across the HousingWire weekend desk, with more coverage to come on bigger issues.

The mooted Federal Reserve tapering of its asset purchases has the capital markets on tenterhooks. So much so, a report in the Financial Times suggests investors are scurrying for riskier parts of the debt markets.

That means junk bonds. Essentially the Fed’s attempt to stabilize the markets may actually harm as those investors exit safe havens as the government does as well.

It’s that old chestnut again: Rising mortgage interest rates and the upward creep of home prices is taking a toll on housing affordability. That is the news from USA Today Sunday report hinged on data from John Burns Real Estate Consulting and Zillow.

The problem is grounded in six key housing markets, five of them in California, and all of them on the Western Seaboard, the newspaper reports. In these cities — which, of course, include San Francisco — home prices have risen dramatically in tandem with the lauded housing recovery.

Furthermore, the cost of housing in 30 of 250 metropolitan areas will exceed historical averages for affordability and the average mortgage rate will pass the dreaded 5% mark.

The Washington Post reported on a weighty potential problem for the wider U.S. economy: the “outsize” influence of the graying population on the housing economy.

According to a study conducted by the Center for Regional Analysis at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., quoted by the newspaper, baby boomers in the Washington, D.C., area make up just 26% of the total area population but account for 47% of the region’s homeowners.

That could be viewed as a microcosm, a kind of allegory for a nation facing a coming calamity — widely written about and apparently occurring in a number of regions across the country, far outside the Beltway and its close confines.

The debate over eminent domain continues apace. Of late, Richmond, Calif., has been ground zero over planned use of the controversial measure.

The city government intends to put the legal mechanism to work to seize troubled mortgages within its limits from bondholders — under the pretext of saving communities. In response, the municipality is facing a legal fight from investors. The Federal Housing Finance Agency, guardian of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, may also take adverse action.

But one voice emerged late last week in support of the Richmond eminent domain plan in a prominent financial organ. Stephen Mihm, associate professor of history at the University of Georgia, wrote a column for Bloomberg claiming the Richmond case had merit, unlike, he wrote, with other examples where state authorities had excessively used eminent domain powers. He argues in favor of a train of thought that says by using eminent domain to keep homeowners in their properties, the risk of default likely would decrease, thereby benefiting the mortgage investors.

“In fact, the city’s plan relies not on a novel use of eminent domain but on one endorsed by the conservative Supreme Court of 1935,” wrote Mihm.

Some more negative press for foreclosure attorneys: The Denver Post carried a report alleging a number of homeowners in Colorado had become the victims of large legal bills in relation to “phantom court cases against them.”

“The Post found 126 foreclosures since January 2012 in which homeowners in 11 counties were told by county public trustees to pay the charges associated with the filings or the foreclosure would continue,” the newspaper reported. “But, in fact, no foreclosure lawsuit was filed.”

Fannie and Freddie appear to be continuing their befuddlement of different points on the investment vehicle spectrum.

 

 

read more…

 

http://www.housingwire.com/articles/26255-monday-morning-cup-of-coffee-housing-takes-a-beating

Armonk’s Mariani Gardens Granted Zoning Text Amendment For Café Plans | Armonk Homes

Mariani Gardens in Armonk was recently granted a zoning text amendment from the North Castle Town Board to enlarge its café, according to a report by The Examiner News.

The text amendment would allow the Armonk nursery, located on Bedford Road, to enlarge its café from 1,000-square-feet to up to 3,500-square feet, and it would also be able to increase its seating capacity from 16 to 72, the report said. Certain home furnishing and luxury items, like soaps, lotions and jewelry, could also be sold at the business.

The final step in granting the zoning revision is approval from the North Castle Planning Board.

The text amendment was granted after two years of debate and revised proposals, according to the report.

To read the full story, click here.

 

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http://armonk.dailyvoice.com/news/mariani-gardens-expansion-approval-tops-armonk-news-week